One That Got Away

Round 2

I played this game down to five minutes, and then while thinking about playing 24…Nb6, which draws easily, and the ugly looking 24….Nf6??  I chose the latter because it looked more forcing, and I decided I was going to play it quickly and hope it wasn’t a blunder because I was not nervous at all but very unimpressed that I had left myself once again with so little time to my opponents remaining whole hour.  She captured and pushed c7, then I realized it was over.  I had looked at c7 with Rc1, and looked at Rfd1, but I hadn’t put them together as c7, and then Rd1, but I saw my blunder as soon as she had pushed the pawn.  In the post-mortem, I held it easily and she was the one who had to hold on.

The idea I hadn’t bothered to analyze the whole way at the end was 24…Nb6, 25.Rc1 Rc8, 26.Nf6+ Kg7, 27.Nd7?? Nb6xNd7 I made a conscious decision not to spend more time on purpose, but that was a very bad idea because I was also offering a trade which needed to be correct.

14…Bxc5! was a nice find, but I spend too long on moves like this.  I see it a a couple moves prior but then spend like 15 minutes when the move arrives as a long blunder-check.  Apparently 14…e5! was a stronger try for advantage.  My move equalizes.

18…gxB.  I was going to play 18…QxN!, but forgot my analysis when this position arrived, and realized I could play for a simple draw anyway.  18…QxN, 19.Bxg7 Rfe8, 20.Bc3 Qe4+, 21.Be2 Ba6, 22.Qb2.  I had seen this far, but not until I see it set up on the computer do I notice that 22…Bxe2 simply wins the bishop.  23.QxBe2?? Qb1+.  Therefore, surprisingly after 22.0-0 Ba6xBe2, Black has won that bishop but it still not winning.

This game once again shows that it is a victory to draw with Black, but once the draw is in sight, it is easy to forget what a big deal it is just to get a draw with Black against a lower-rated player.  Once it seemed as though the draw was no longer a big deal is right when I screwed up.  Alex said I should have played for the win when I had my chance, but really the draw as Black is the big deal, it’s the reason you drive all the way over there and show up is just to get that draw, and if they want to blunder that’s great but you can’t force them to, and you most of all can’t show disdain for the draw, or it’s a loss every time in my experience.  Draws are as a rule much tougher games than wins, and usually come with the Black pieces.  This could have been one of my best games had I drawn it.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “One That Got Away

  1. Though from computer’s point of view 14.. e5 is not better than Bxc5, I would agree with you that it gives your opponent more possibilities to go wrong.
    In your line starting from 18… Qxf4 and ending with 22.0-0 Bxe2 Black has 1.5 advantage.
    24… Nf6 could be explained as desire to go for a rook endgame, but from the positional point of view your knight should stay close to the passed pawn and her knight is out of play anyway.

  2. Hello Brian!

    I have been following your blog for about 2 or 3 years. I read most of your articles, but I rather stay away from commenting these. Now I am going to make an exception. I hope you will get what I mean.

    I do not get the idea of “playing for a draw” and especially “obtaining a draw when you played the game with Black colour is a success”. They are simply bull** for me. The first case is a very bad approach due to the limitation of your (present and future) development. Why is that? It is simply because you are focused “not to loose” the game approach instead of “doing your best no matter the score” attitude.

    The second “miracle” is based on the assumption that playing with White means you are the boss and everything you say (on the board) your opponent is forced to do. In my humble opinion it is false (incorrect) approach too! Do NOT make distinction to the colour you are playing nor the players whom you are competing against. This way you can go a way further than with “standard common approaches” (written above).

    While I am playing chess I try to focus on the game as much as possible. I do not take care of the colour and the only factor that counts to me very much is the effort and approach to the games I have played so far. The score is not important anymore as long as I do my best taking the conditions I met every game I play.

    If you want to get what I really mean, just have a look at my games (NokiaTwenty) against Introspection. You can even check out these with the help of engines to witness how many of these I should have lost, but anyway I saved these to a draw. Of course the games as available at: http://www.ficsgames.org/

    Let me know what you think about my critical approach (if you agree or not) and if you have watched the games – are you surprised or shocked by the miracles I have done at these! Looking forward to your reply.

    BTW. Do not focus at my rating as I have already started to practice chess and I have to learn a lot to play decent level (2200 FICS is a decent level imho). We probably play the same level, but I think I have been tested more ideas and have another approach to chess.

  3. I looked at some of your games. You take a dynamic approach like most players on FICS. On FICS, the King’s Gambit is huge, any gambit, 1.e4 is king. The most aggressive lines for Black are played. That’s great and is what makes it so entertaining. OTB, people don’t play the same way at longer time controls, and tend to easily spot the trickery their opponents may be up to.

    Chess is a draw. I do win a lot with White, but where would my rating be without that, and why do you think that is a bad thing?

    ” “obtaining a draw when you played the game with Black colour is a success”. They are simply bull** for me.”

    Go tell that to Magnus Carlsen and Sergey Karjakin. Magnus was happy with his Game 11 draw today, beaming. Go there and tell him that to his face or at the press conference, and see what kind of response you get.

    For me, a lot of times a draw is a huge success, much bigger than winning because where a win might come easily, a draw might take more skill, ability, personal strength and qualities. It’s one thing to talk with specifics, but you talk in generalities more than you should, IMHO. I looked at your chess blog, for me quite a bit of it was too general to be useful.

    I draw very few games. When I look back on my “chess career”, it was the draw or draws as Black that had the biggest impression on me regarding how hard I had to fight to get them. Some of my wins were pretty, inspired, but the draws took everything that I had that I could give. I miss out on a lot of draws going for the win, or by being lazy, but in both cases that is more of a deficiency, missing those draws, than wins or losses.

    I’ll even say this. Going for a win can be determined by a general sense, cooperation from your opponent, or strong calculation. With a draw, for me at least although maybe not for everyone, I see that you have to know exactly what you are doing, and can’t screw it up at all or you will almost always fail. A draw is a far higher degree of difficulty for me in my own games, and perhaps it is due to my style. I wouldn’t expect everyone else to have that same sense for themselves, as others abilities might be different.

    My impression of your style on FICS? You play as quick as you should for the time-control. You play sharp, offbeat stuff, keep accurate evaluations of the positions, and then display a degree of endgame competency that your opponents are simply not expecting given your style and the time-control. It probably hurts them on the clock that you play so sharp, and then you don’t give away anything in the endgame later, a double-whammy. I’m not surprised at all by your rating, and I’ve seen your handle on their for years, a very long time.

  4. Hello again

    I am not sure if you get me right, but I have an impression that some of my thought could have been misunderstood. Now I will try to make things right.

    1. First and foremost – My intention was NOT to critize your style or performance, but the approach by itself. It it was Carlsen’s approach – I would do the same (actually I disagree with him about the approach to fortresses). No hard feelings, please.

    2. Chess is a drawish game and I do not have any doubts about that. The strongest engines has proven it thousands of times so far and we cannot refute it.

    3. I do not get the idea of “draw success because I played Black”. Ok, I know in most cases it is (much) harder than the same result while playing white. Anyway FOR ME it is not a success. The success to me is to play as best as I can and no matter the colour, the opponent or even the time control (except very fast blitzes, because you cannot think too deep due to heavy time limit). And even if Magnus or Sergey would say they are happy with a draw – I am (and I will) not. However if they say this way, they probably want to point out that they had sufficient resources (knowledge, experience, stamina, perseverance) to NEUTRALIZE (completely) white’s slight advantage from the starting position. Anyway for me it is not a success, but normal result of the game. The success is to play my best NO MATTER the result. I know, I am not chess professional and I can say this way, because my life does not depend on chess (and the income from it).

    4. Even if for most people playing Black and obtaining a draw is a success, I simply see chess as the fight. My goal is to do my best and see what happens – the colour does not mean anything to me: at least I do not focus on having more white’s than black’s, etc.

    5. If drawing is more precious than winning (I mean these “hard thought draws”) than I fully agree with you and admire such approach. Let me quote you: “For me, a lot of times a draw is a huge success, much bigger than winning because where a win might come easily, a draw might take more skill, ability, personal strength and qualities”.

    6. My chess blog is NOT recommended to anyone who is more than 1500-1600 rated. The main reason of my blog is to inspire, provoke and give some food for thought. It has nothing to offer, except for some short chess book reviews and some very low level articles. I know it and I fully agree with you [“I looked at your chess blog, for me quite a bit of it was too general to be useful”].

    7. [Quote] “It’s one thing to talk with specifics, but you talk in generalities more than you should, IMHO”. If I had the necessity to talk about specific – I could (would) do it. Anyway I do not feel any urgency or necessity to do so and that’s why I do not do this. I refuted the approach “you can just talk about generalities” at least dozen of times. I am not interested at proofs to do so again and again. You can believe me or ignore the facts.

    8. There are a lot of good and very good chess books on the market. There is no sense to me to write about anything what has been written A WAY better than I could do it when I had to. That’s one of the main reasons I stay away from writing any “higher class articles”. I hope you know what I mean. If not, I can explain.

    9. [Quote] “I draw very few games. When I look back on my “chess career”, it was the draw or draws as Black that had the biggest impression on me regarding how hard I had to fight to get them. Some of my wins were pretty, inspired, but the draws took everything that I had that I could give. I miss out on a lot of draws going for the win, or by being lazy, but in both cases that is more of a deficiency, missing those draws, than wins or losses”. If that’s the case everything is completely fine and you probably have the approach very close to mine, but we point out the stress to a bit different aspects of draws. Anyway I admire and appreciate such “special kind of draws” as you mentioned!

    10. [Quote] “A draw is a far higher degree of difficulty for me in my own games, and perhaps it is due to my style. I wouldn’t expect everyone else to have that same sense for themselves, as others abilities might be different”. That explains a lot! For me draws are rare because I achieve these very seldom – most often it is the inability of my opponent to finish me off! If I had a style I could say if it harms my winning ratio 😉

    11. If I could play much better at the opening part I would be 2100 a long time ago. Anyway I am too lazy to make my own opening repertoire.

    12. Let’s take the only correction: obtaining a draw when you played the game with Black colour is not a success, but if anyone wants to call it this way – he can do it as many times as he wants. I want to take back one too strong word “bull**” (that word I used in the previous post) as it can make too big emotional damage and make unnecessary misunderstanding. Sorry for that. I simply wanted to be clear what I think about this. My intention was NOT to hurt you or make hard feelings.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s