The Smooth Game

Round 1

This was the first time that I’ve played Scott with the Black pieces.  I finished the game with 40 minutes remaining.  I was seeing the possible moves on each move very well.  I realized where he went wrong and took advantage of it, and gave him some post-game pointers.

This game went really well and easy for me because it was a Guioco Piano, and I understand the ideas behind this opening rather well, it’s similar to many other 1.e4 e5 games.  The problem for White is that this type of opening often gets so tactical that the higher-rated player (better tactician) can easily prevail.  I even offered him the Two Knights variation.   1.d4 is a much more difficult opening for me to play against.

A Philidor draw position

This game was played at 3min, 2sec inc.  See if you can spot the draw.  I flagged in the final position.  This game is another indication that you really need to know your endgames, particularly when playing gambits!

Did I really just pwn a chess Master from Los Angeles at 3min/2sec?

Linuxguy-vs-LAChessMaster

Players who go after my endgame technique generally have more success.  lol.

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2 thoughts on “The Smooth Game

  1. I am the same with 1. e4 e5 and 1. d4.
    Regarding the game – “Massacre of the Innocents”. 🙂
    I had a 50% probability today to get a 1-point bye, so I decided not to go and take a regular bye.

  2. It looks like I am going to go today. My car started acting up, and will drive Alex’s new used car, if we go. I will get either Dean or Shirley, most likely with White. So, basically, I will be expected to obliterate my competition tonight. 😉

    I’m slowly, finally, starting to build up my strength against 1.d4, but virtually never face it online. Online is for the craziest, gambity stuff, and then OTB many players don’t want to “risk their rating” and so play the slow, positional 1.d4. d4 players often try to get a Colle, or a Stonewall, or a Carlsbad, or a Catalan structure. They play the percentages, and want Black to take all the risks.

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