Sometimes, endgames are richer in possibilities.

If you want to play 1…Nf6, 2…e6 against 1.d4, you have to learn to at least be able to draw the endgame.  I was successful this time, but the part that is most amazing about this game are the endgame moves/variations that weren’t played.  Most of the chess content in this game was really in the endgame, going over “what if’s” with Houdini.

[Event “Live Chess”]
[Site “Chess.com”]
[Date “2017.04.09”]
[White “Eqilibrio”]
[Black “linuxguy1”]
[WhiteElo “1583”]
[BlackElo “1594”]
[TimeControl “300+5”]
[ECO “D40”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Termination “linuxguy1 won by resignation”]
[CurrentPosition “8/5p2/4p3/KPbk1p2/2p2P1p/4P2P/2N3P1/8 b – – 6 40”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.a3 d5 4.e3 c5 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Nf3 h6 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.b4 Be7 9.Bb2 O-O 10.Be2 dxc4 11.Bxc4 Qxd1+ 12.Rxd1 Rd8 13.O-O Rxd1 14.Rxd1 Kf8 15.h3 a6 16.Na4 b5 17.Nb6 Rb8 18.Nxc8 Rxc8 19.Bb3 Ke8 20.Rc1 Na7 21.Rxc8+ Nxc8 22.Ne5 Nb6 23.Nc6 Bd6 24.Bxf6 gxf6 25.Kf1 Kd7 26.Nd4 Be5 27.Ke2 f5 28.f4 Bf6 29.Kd3 Kd6 30.Nf3 Kc6 31.Kc2 Nc4 32.Bxc4 bxc4 33.Nd4+ Kd5 34.Kc3 h5 35.a4 h4 36.b5 axb5 37.axb5 Bd8 38.Kb4 Bb6 39.Nc2 Bc5+ 40.Ka5 c3 41.b6 Bxb6+ 42.Kxb6 Kc4 43.Nd4 Kd3 44.Kc5 c2 45.Nxc2 Kxc2 46.Kd4 Kd2 47.e4 fxe4 48.Kxe4 Ke2 49.f5 Kf2 50.fxe6 fxe6 51.Kf4 Kxg2 52.Kg4 e5 53.Kxh4 e4 54.Kg4 e3 55.h4 e2 56.h5 e1=Q  0-1

https://www.chess.com/live#g=2041614081

It’s interesting that another player just tried that same opening against me, and got nowhere.  This time, I chose to play 10….dxc4 right away, rather than 10…h6 first.  You’d think this loss of tempo would be the end of my position, but I actually developed quite well, and missed the win of a piece with ….Bc2 instead of ….Bxh3?, in the middlegame.

[Event “Live Chess”]
[Site “Chess.com”]
[Date “2017.04.09”]
[White “KUFR-RAI”]
[Black “linuxguy1”]
[WhiteElo “1598”]
[BlackElo “1602”]
[TimeControl “300+5”]
[ECO “D40”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Termination “linuxguy1 won by resignation”]
[CurrentPosition “7R/8/8/8/1pr4p/7K/1k6/8 b – – 3 53”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.a3 d5 4.e3 c5 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.Nc3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 cxd4 8.exd4 Bd6 9.O-O h6 10.d5 exd5 11.Nxd5 O-O 12.h3 Bf5 13.b4 Rc8 14.Qb3 Ne5 15.Nxe5 Bxe5 16.Nxf6+ Qxf6 17.Ra2 Qg6 18.Bb2 Bxh3 19.Qxh3 Bxb2 20.Bxf7+ Qxf7 21.Rxb2 Qf5 22.Qxf5 Rxf5 23.Rb3 b5 24.g3 Rc2 25.Re3 Kf7 26.Kg2 Rd5 27.Rfe1 Rdd2 28.Re7+ Kg6 29.R1e5 Rxf2+ 30.Kh3 Rc3 31.Rxa7 Rff3 32.Re6+ Kh7 33.Ree7 Rxg3+ 34.Kh2 Rxa3 35.Rxg7+ Rxg7 36.Rxa3 Rg4 37.Rb3 Kg6 38.Kh3 h5 39.Rb2 Kg5 40.Rb3 Kf5 41.Rb2 Ke5 42.Re2+ Kd5 43.Rd2+ Kc4 44.Rb2 Kc3 45.Rb1 Kc2 46.Rf1 Rxb4 47.Rf5 h4 48.Rc5+ Kb3 49.Re5 Ka3 50.Re8 Rc4 51.Rb8 b4 52.Ra8+ Kb2 53.Rh8  0-1

https://www.chess.com/live#g=2041777240

My point of showing this game is to show that this opening is totally survivable for Black, for someone that might want to adopt a technical approach to this 3.a3 line.

Different opening, but I seem to get this one a lot from 1600 and above, they force me into a Breyer variation, which I’m willing to play but know it’s tough.  This Ba4-c2 move that they play, sort of takes the Lopez into different lines than the mainline Chigorin.

[ECO “C87”]
[Event “Live Chess”]
[Site “Chess.com”]
[Date “2017.04.10”]
[White “kiscsuri57”]
[Black “linuxguy1”]
[WhiteElo “1603”]
[BlackElo “1613”]
[TimeControl “300+5”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Termination “linuxguy1 won by resignation”]
[CurrentPosition “r3r1k1/1b3ppp/p2p4/1p1P1P2/2p1nbPq/2P4P/PP1N2N1/R2QR1K1 b – – 1 24”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 d6 7.c3 b5 8.Bc2 O-O 9.h3 Bb7 10.d4 Re8 11.Nbd2 Bf8 12.d5 Nb8 13.Nf1 Nbd7 14.N3h2 c5 15.f4 c4 16.f5 Nc5 17.Bg5 Be7 18.g4 Nxd5 19.exd5 Bxg5 20.Nf3 Bf4 21.Ne3 e4 22.Nd2 Qh4 23.Bxe4 Nxe4 24.Ng2  0-1

I was planning on finishing this game with 24…Qf2+, 25.Kh1 Ne4-g3+, 26.Kh2 Nf1 (double-check) 27.Kh1 Bxd5.

https://www.chess.com/live#g=2042062522

Yet another unusual opening try for Black, the Schallop Defense to the King’s Knight Gambit.  White usually has some troubles when going in unprepared because it has that look like it shouldn’t work as well as it does.

[Event “Live Chess”]
[Site “Chess.com”]
[Date “2017.04.10”]
[White “pablopastore”]
[Black “linuxguy1”]
[WhiteElo “1618”]
[BlackElo “1621”]
[TimeControl “300+5”]
[ECO “C34”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Termination “linuxguy1 won by resignation”]
[CurrentPosition “r4rk1/ppp2ppp/2nb3q/5b1n/2BPNp2/3Q4/PPP3PP/R1B2RK1 w – – 0 14”]

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e5 Nh5 5.Bc4 d5 6.exd6 Bxd6 7.O-O O-O 8.d4 Nc6 9.Nc3 Bg4 10.Qd3 Qf6 11.Ne4 Qg6 12.Nh4 Qh6 13.Nf5 Bxf5  0-1

https://www.chess.com/live#g=2043327394

Best game of the day, an Open Sicilian.  This game was OTB tournament-worthy.

[ECO “B84”]
[Event “Live Chess”]
[Site “Chess.com”]
[Date “2017.04.10”]
[White “linuxguy1”]
[Black “viktorskripach”]
[WhiteElo “1606”]
[BlackElo “1607”]
[TimeControl “300+5”]
[Result “1-0”]
[Termination “linuxguy1 won on time”]
[CurrentPosition “Rr4k1/1P3p1p/2PNp1p1/1P1n4/8/8/6PP/7K b – – 1 34”]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.f4 Qc7 8.O-O b5 9.Bf3 Bb7 10.e5 dxe5 11.fxe5 Nfd7 12.Bf4 Bc5 13.Kh1 O-O 14.Ne4 Bxd4 15.Qxd4 Nc6 16.Qd6 Rac8 17.Qxc7 Rxc7 18.Nd6 Ba8 19.a4 Ndxe5 20.Bxe5 Nxe5 21.Bxa8 Rxa8 22.axb5 a5 23.b4 a4 24.c4 g6 25.c5 Nd3 26.b6 Rd7 27.b7 Rb8 28.Rxa4 Ne5 29.Ra8 Nc6 30.Rfa1 Rdd8 31.b5 Ne7 32.c6 Nd5 33.Rxb8 Rxb8 34.Ra8  1-0

https://www.chess.com/live#g=2043492232

Yesterday, I went over a game, Charousek vs Steinitz 1896 (0-1), The Bishop’s King’s Gambit.  All I knew to play was 3…Ne7 and 4…d5, and figured out the rest while playing.  Until moving 14, I was playing best moves, when I could have simply taken the knight, then I missed a mate against him a move or so later.  The funny thing is that a long time ago, many years, I got this a lot as Black on FICS, and then everybody switched over from the bishop’s gambit to the knight’s gambit.  I sort of forgot what to do, but then after the game this is kind of all coming back to me, just wasn’t sure of evals or anything.  Very entertaining opening, worth a look.

[ECO “C33”]
[Event “Live Chess”]
[Site “Chess.com”]
[Date “2017.04.10”]
[White “JohnSmith369”]
[Black “linuxguy1”]
[WhiteElo “1636”]
[BlackElo “1610”]
[TimeControl “300+5”]
[Result “0-1”]
[Termination “linuxguy1 won by resignation”]
[CurrentPosition “rnbqkb1r/ppp1nppp/8/3P4/2BP1p2/8/PPP3PP/RNBQK1NR b KQkq – 0 5”]

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Ne7 4.d4 d5 5.exd5 Nxd5 6.Nf3 Ne3 7.Bxe3 fxe3 8.Ne5 Qh4+ 9.g3 Qe4 10.O-O Bh3 11.Bxf7+ Kd8 12.Qf3 e2 13.Re1 Qxd4+ 14.Qf2 Bc5 15.Rxe2 Qxf2+ 16.Rxf2 Rf8 17.b4 Bxf2+ 18.Kxf2 Ke7 19.Nc3 Rxf7+ 20.Nxf7 Kxf7 21.Ne4 Nc6 22.Ng5+ Kg6 23.Nxh3 Rd8 24.Nf4+ Kf7 25.c3 Rd2+ 26.Ne2 Ne5 27.Ke3 Rc2 28.Ke4 Rxe2+ 29.Kf4 Nc4 30.Rf1 Ke7 31.Kf3 Re3+ 32.Kf4 Re6 33.Rd1 Nd6 34.a4 Re4+ 35.Kf3 Rc4 36.Rd3 b5 37.a5 a6 38.h4 Nf5 39.h5 g6 40.g4 Ng7 41.h6 Ne6 42.Re3 Kf7 43.Ke2 Ng5 44.Kd3 Rxg4  0-1

https://www.chess.com/live#g=2043631889

I was cracking up after this game thinking about the right thinking method in chess should bring rating points and then it crossed my mind that I play the most busted up lines in nearly every game.  Online blitz for me is totally non-standard, crazy @ss stuff.  But even here it goes to show that you can apply right thinking methods during analysis.  It’s not _just_ pattern-recognition, even if that is perhaps the biggest component, there is also staying focused, particularly analyzing as much as you can during your opponent’s turn.  This is a big thing, and naturally it requires one-ply deeper of visualization than on your own turn.

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