Strong Swiss – finish

 

Round 4

 

This tournament, for me, finished in a rather unusual manner.  First tournament  where I’ve ever finished with this exact overall result.

Sam proposed a draw when we were both around 17 or 18 minutes.  I thought for a few minutes, and didn’t see a productive way forward, but I guess that was a premature evaluation.  I’ll have to really dig into this game and position.  perhaps, if I trade rooks and try hard to keep his bishop bad, I could at least work with my space advantage, but of course I saw my bishop as being bad, although perhaps it is doing more by supporting the center.  Wow, this is where chess gets hard.  hehe.

 

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.11.29”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Sam Bridle”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1800”]
[ECO “B00”]
[EventDate “2018.11.29”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1903”]

1. e4 Nc6 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 g6 5. h3 Bg7 6. Be3 O-O 7. Qd2 e5 8. d5 Ne7
9. O-O-O Bd7 10. g4 b5 11. g5 b4 12. gxf6 bxc3 13. Qxc3 Bxf6 14. Bh6 Bg7 15.
Bxg7 Kxg7 16. Nh2 f6 17. Qd2 f5 18. f3 fxe4 19. fxe4 Rf4 20. Bg2 Bb5 21. Ng4 h5
22. Ne3 Qd7 1/2-1/2

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The Gurgenidze takes a hit

Round 4, final round

This was the final round for the November Swiss.  It’s funny, each week the initial projections for pairings changed, as one player would be added, or taking a bye.  I was originally projected to be paired with Mark, but was actually pleasantly surprised to get Paul, because I knew it will be a tough battle that is not too openings-bound.

17.bxc6  I’m guessing this is a mistake.  Even at the board, I felt I had to play the obvious and solid 17.dxc, but few are as tempted by dubious moves as I have been, since forever.  lol.  After playing it, I realized my error, that …c4 will occur.  I played the piece-sac in less than a minute, largely because I had already spent a lot of time looking at Nxb5 piece-sacs earlier.

 

[Event “November Swiss”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2018.11.27”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Paul Anderson”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1985”]
[ECO “B12”]
[EventDate “2018.11.27”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1893”]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Na6 4. c3 Nc7 5. Bd3 g6 6. h3 h5 7. Na3 Ne6 8. Ne2 Ng7
9. c4 Bf5 10. O-O Bxd3 11. Qxd3 e6 12. c5 b6 13. b4 Nf5 14. Bd2 Be7 15. Rfc1
Ngh6 16. b5 bxc5 17. bxc6 c4 18. Nxc4 dxc4 19. Rxc4 O-O 20. c7 Qd7 21. Rb1 Rfc8
22. Ba5 Bf8 23. Qf3 Qd5 24. Qxd5 exd5 25. Rc3 Ne7 26. Bb4 Nhf5 27. Bd6 f6 28.
g4 Kf7 29. gxf5 Nxf5 30. Bxf8 Kxf8 31. f4 Kf7 32. Rb5 Ne7 33. Kf2 Ke6 34. Ng3
h4 35. Ne2 fxe5 36. fxe5 Rf8+ 37. Kg2 Kd7 38. Rb7 Rfc8 39. Nf4 a5 40. Rc5 Ra6
41. Nxd5 Nxd5 42. Rxd5+ Kc6 43. Rdb5 Rxc7 44. d5+ Kd7 45. e6+ Kd6 46. Rb8 Ke7
47. Rg8 Kf6 48. Rf8+ Kg7 49. Rd8 Kf6 50. Kf3 g5 51. Ke4 Rc2 52. Rf8+ Kg6 53.
Kd3 Rxa2 54. e7 Ra3+ 55. Kd4 Ra4+ 56. Ke5 Ra1 57. e8=Q+ Kg7 58. Qf7+ Kh6 59.
Rh8# 1-0

2nd annual ThanksGiving Open

Tournaments like these would be better not blogged about, but since this _is_ a blog, I will treat it like another diary entry.

This tournament was a little unusual for me, as the first round game was not much of a fight, although it was a fun and memorable game, but it didn’t get me emotionally into the tournament.  There was no feeling like I had got my nerves into a battle.  My first round game was the quickest finished.  Afterward, I wasn’t hungry, but ate anyway as it gave me something to do to pass the time, after looking at the other games and talking to others.

In round two, I made an impatient move, blunder, and resigned.  Earl had been taking a lot of time, when I saw only straightforward moves.  I knew we had four games to play today, and wanted to get on with the play, but when Earl starts spending too much time, it’s almost always because he is planning a kingside strike.  Earl likes to plan his moves before the strike, so it comes as more of a surprise to me because most players spend their time on an attack just when they need to and not in advance the way he does; then he plays the actual moves of the attack quickly.  Earl often focuses in on a line, and often doesn’t shake it off, so he is highly efficient.  He is also knowledgeable and creative with his openings.

Round three I was playing well as Black, but it was taking too much time for me to decide on the moves.  In the end, I got into time-pressure, then got blitzed in my time-pressure, and turned a promising position into a loss.  After I moved …Qd6 late, I thought I should have played …Qc5 to blockade his pawn, and then he sacked his c-pawn, and apparently I shouldn’t have taken it, but I also made a silly decision to give up my a-pawn in time-pressure, and gave up c and d pawns as well.  This is why I need the time.  When I blitz, my chess is full of silly moves that look hardly believable.

Round four was against Ayush, a young kid who habitually spends more time away from the board than at the board.

 

Round 1

[Event “2nd annual ThanksGiving Open”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.11.24”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Will Wolf”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1911”]
[ECO “C29”]
[EventDate “2018.11.24”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1399”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 d5 4. fxe5 Nxe4 5. d3 Qh4+ 6. g3 Nxg3 7. Nf3 Qh5 8.
Nxd5 Bg4 9. Nf4 Bxf3 10. Nxh5 Bxd1 11. hxg3 Bf3 12. Rh2 Nc6 13. Rf2 Bxh5 0-1

 

Round 2

[Event “2nd annual ThanksGiving Open”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.11.24”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Earl Wikle”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “2006”]
[ECO “C02”]
[EventDate “2018.11.24”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1913”]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Bd7 6. Be2 Nge7 7. Na3 cxd4 8. cxd4
Nf5 9. Nc2 Qb6 10. O-O Na5 11. b3 Bb5 12. Bd3 Nc6 13. g4 Nfe7 14. a4 Bxd3 15.
Qxd3 h5 16. h3 hxg4 17. hxg4 Ng6 18. Bd2 Rh3 19. Kg2 Rxf3 0-1

 

Round 3

[Event “2nd annual ThanksGiving Open”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.11.24”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Alexander Bozhenov”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1911”]
[ECO “C60”]
[EventDate “2018.11.24”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “2003”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. O-O g6 5. Re1 Bg7 6. c3 O-O 7. d3 a6 8. Ba4
b5 9. Bc2 d5 10. Nbd2 d4 11. Nb3 Qd6 12. Qe2 dxc3 13. bxc3 a5 14. a4 b4 15. c4
Bg4 16. h3 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 f5 18. Qe2 f4 19. Qf3 Nd4 20. Nxd4 Qxd4 21. Rb1 Qc3
22. Qe2 Qd4 23. Bb2 Qd6 24. c5 Qxc5 25. Bb3+ Kh8 26. Rbc1 Qd6 27. Qc2 Rac8 28.
Qc5 Qd7 29. Qxa5 c5 30. Qb5 Nc6 31. Qxc5 Nd4 32. Qd5 Qxd5 33. Bxd5 Bf6 34. Bxd4
Rxc1 35. Rxc1 exd4 36. Kh2 Kg7 37. g3 fxg3+ 38. Kxg3 Rd8 39. f4 Rd7 40. Kg4 Be7
41. Rc6 Kh6 42. h4 Kg7 43. h5 gxh5+ 44. Kxh5 Rd6 45. Rc7 Rh6+ 46. Kg4 Kf8 47.
e5 Rh2 48. f5 Rd2 49. Bc4 b3 50. f6 Bd8 51. Rc8 Ke8 52. f7+ Ke7 53. Rxd8 Kxd8
54. f8=Q+ Kc7 55. Qd6+ Kb7 56. Qb4+ 1-0

 

Round 4

[Event “2nd annual ThanksGiving Open”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.11.24”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Ayush Vispute”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1309”]
[ECO “B51”]
[EventDate “2018.11.24”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1911”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. Bxc6+ bxc6 5. d3 Nf6 6. O-O g6 7. e5 dxe5 8.
Nxe5 Qd5 9. Re1 Bg7 10. Nc3 Qd6 11. Qf3 Bb7 12. Nc4 Qd7 13. Be3 O-O 14. Bxc5
Rfe8 15. Ne4 Nxe4 16. Qxe4 Bf6 17. c3 Ba6 18. Rad1 Rad8 19. Ne5 Qd5 20. Qxd5
Rxd5 21. d4 Bxe5 22. Rxe5 Rxe5 23. dxe5 Be2 24. Rd7 a6 25. Bxe7 Bg4 26. Rc7 Kg7
27. Bf6+ Kh6 28. Rxf7 1-0

The streak stands at 16 games

Round 3

We both got down to 7 minutes, a piece, when I offered the draw.  It’s unfortunate that we both needed more than 90+ minutes to play out this game, as there was a lot of life still left in it.

I looked at the game without an engine, and realized that I had missed 26.Nd5.  I also correctly saw a likely continuation.  26…h4 (the move he probably would have played, or at least wanted to), 27.Qf2 Qb7, 28.Be3 f5!?  I spotted this before I saw it with an engine.  It’s a crazy line.  There definitely would have been a crazy line to follow, unless one side simply blunders.

I might play on Saturday.  It’s four-rounds of G/70, 30 increment, but it would almost surely mean killing the undefeated streak, particularly as I have normally been sleeping during the day.  I was hoping to get the streak to 20 games, since Expert Paul Anderson’s longest undefeated streak lasted for 19 games.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess”]
[Date “2018.11.21”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Mark McGough”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1820”]
[ECO “B41”]
[EventDate “2018.11.21”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1913”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. c4 Qc7 6. Nc3 d6 7. Be2 Nd7 8. Be3
b6 9. O-O Bb7 10. Rc1 Ngf6 11. f3 h5 12. Qd2 Rc8 13. Rfd1 Be7 14. b3 Qb8 15.
Nc2 O-O 16. Bf4 Ne5 17. Ne1 Rfe8 18. Nd3 Nfd7 19. Bf1 Nxd3 20. Bxd3 Ne5 21. Bf1
Bc6 22. a4 a5 23. Qf2 Nd7 24. Qg3 Ne5 25. Be2 Qc7 26. Rd2 1/2-1/2

King movement in the endgame

Round 3

Playing an endgame on the increment, I just don’t have enough endgame experience to do that.  Need to study more endgames.

After the game, I told him that his 45…fxg4+ was brilliant.  We were both in time-pressure, but he had seen quickly enough that he could give up his last pawn.  After 45…f4? (which was all that I was expecting), 46.Ke4, which was my plan, is winning.  I couldn’t figure out whether to trade some pawns on kingside first or move my king to the center.  I knew this game would look foolish, in hindsight, had I not won it, but time-pressure has the ability to make fools of us all, and it often leads to a half-point being thrown away.

[Event “November Swiss”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2018.11.20”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Chris Motley”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1602”]
[ECO “B04”]
[EventDate “2018.11.20”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1913”]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 g6 5. c4 Nb6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. Nbd2 Bf5 8. Be2
dxe5 9. Nxe5 Bxe5 10. dxe5 Nc6 11. Nf3 Qxd1+ 12. Rxd1 Nb4 13. Nd4 O-O-O 14. O-O
Bd7 15. a3 Nc6 16. Nb5 a6 17. Nc3 Nxe5 18. Bd4 f6 19. Bxb6 cxb6 20. Nd5 Rhe8
21. Nxb6+ Kc7 22. Nxd7 Nxd7 23. f4 e5 24. fxe5 Rxe5 25. Bf3 f5 26. b4 Re3 27.
a4 Ra3 28. a5 Rb3 29. Rb1 Rxb1 30. Rxb1 Nf6 31. Re1 Rd7 32. Re6 Ng8 33. Rb6 Kb8
34. b5 axb5 35. cxb5 Ka7 36. Re6 Ne7 37. Be2 Nc8 38. Re8 Kb8 39. Bc4 Re7 40.
Rxe7 Nxe7 41. Kf2 Kc7 42. Kf3 g5 43. h4 h6 44. hxg5 hxg5 45. g4 fxg4+ 46. Kxg4
Kd6 47. Kxg5 Kc5 48. Be2 Nd5 49. Bf1 Nc7 50. b6 Na8 51. Bg2 Nxb6 52. axb6 Kxb6
53. Bxb7 Kxb7 1/2-1/2

My 14th consecutive game without a loss

Unfortunately, I missed winning chances in this game.  Paul had an hour of time remaining at the end of the game, but that’s no excuse that I didn’t manage my own time well enough, since Paul likes to make the play mostly about the endgame, the later stages are where the opportunities are against him.

Round 2, Strong Swiss

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.11.14”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Paul Covington”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1837”]
[ECO “B22”]
[EventDate “2018.11.14”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1913”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. c3 d5 4. e5 Ne7 5. d4 cxd4 6. cxd4 Nf5 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. Be2
Qb6 9. Na4 Bb4+ 10. Bd2 Bxd2+ 11. Qxd2 Qb4 12. Qxb4 Nxb4 13. O-O b6 14. Nc3 Bd7
15. a3 Nc6 16. Nb5 Ke7 17. g4 Nh6 18. h3 f6 19. Rac1 fxe5 20. Nxe5 Nxe5 21.
dxe5 Bxb5 22. Bxb5 Rac8 23. Ba6 Rxc1 24. Rxc1 Rd8 25. f4 g5 26. Rc7+ Rd7 27.
Rxd7+ Kxd7 28. Kg2 Nf7 29. Kf3 h6 30. Bd3 Ke7 31. Bg6 Nd8 32. Bd3 Nc6 33. b4 b5
34. Ke3 a6 35. Be2 Kf7 36. Bd3 Ke7 37. Be2 Kf7 38. Bd3 Kg7 39. Kf3 h5 40. gxh5
Kh6 41. Bg6 a5 42. bxa5 Nxa5 43. Be8 Nc4 44. Bxb5 Nxa3 45. Bd7 gxf4 46. Kxf4
Kxh5 47. Bxe6 Nc4 48. Bf7+ Kh6 49. e6 Kg7 50. Bh5 Kf6 51. Bg4 Ne5 52. e7 Ng6+
53. Ke3 Kxe7 54. Kd4 Kd6 55. Bf3 Nf4 56. h4 Ne6+ 57. Kd3 Ke5 58. h5 Nf4+ 59.
Ke3 Nxh5 1/2-1/2

 

The English, with an Expert

In my second round game, I played Earl, with the Black pieces.  Earl is normally Expert rated, but his rating dropped just a bit below that due to an upset by Jesse in the City Championship.

Another interesting game to analyze.  At one point, I played 37…Kf8, and then 38…Kf7?? I believe this was played, and it was on his scoresheet, but that’s right about where I messed up my score.  He made a move, I didn’t write it down but instead moved instantly, and then he replied instantly.  I should have written his first move down as soon as he made it.  Anyway, I believe the score is accurate, and the final position certainly is.  Obviously, were were both in time-pressure, making moves with under a minute.  I got down to 5 seconds before playing 35…Qg6, even though I knew it was the only move – crazy sort of thing people do in time-pressure.

[Event “November Swiss”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2018.11.14”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Earl Wikle”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1913”]
[ECO “A25”]
[EventDate “2018.11.14”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1991”]

1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Nd5 O-O 6. Nf3 Re8 7. O-O Nxd5 8.
cxd5 Nd4 9. Nxd4 exd4 10. e4 dxe3 11. dxe3 d6 12. a3 Ba5 13. b4 Bb6 14. Bb2 Bf5
15. Qh5 Bg6 16. Qg4 Qc8 17. Qc4 Qd7 18. a4 a5 19. b5 Re7 20. Rac1 Rae8 21. Bd4
Bxd4 22. Qxd4 b6 23. Rc4 Be4 24. f3 Bf5 25. e4 Bh3 26. Rfc1 Bxg2 27. Kxg2 f5
28. Rxc7 Qd8 29. Qxb6 fxe4 30. fxe4 Rxe4 31. Qa7 Qg5 32. Rf1 Re2+ 33. Kg1
Qh6 34. Rf2 Rxf2 35. Qxf2 Qg6 36. Qc2 Qg5 37. Qc3 Kf8 38. Rc8 Qe7 39. b6 Kf7
40. Rxe8 Qxe8 41. Qf3+ Kg6 42. Qd3+ Kh6 43. Qd2+ Kg6 44. Kf2 h6 45. b7 Qf7+ 46.
Qf4 Qxb7 47. Qxd6+ Kf7 48. Qe6+ Kf8 49. d6 Qf7+ 50. Qxf7+ Kxf7 51. Ke3 Ke6 52.
Kd4 Kxd6 1/2-1/2