Strong Swiss – final round

Round 5

Somehow, I ended up thinking with the clock, instead of the board.  Trading queens was a weak attempt to ditch out of the game, based mostly on clock differences (he was nearly half an hour up on the clock, though we were equal on it for quite a while before that), and it was virtually the losing moves.  I figured that my position was okay, but also quite complicated, which it is.

20.bxc3?  Played this move, thoughtlessly and quickly, after returning from the restroom.  20.BxNh6 would avoid dropping the c-pawn.

I figured, casually, that 23.Nf4 is much better, plugging in the game, but that’s equal at best for White.  23.Rf4 is the move, but it never crossed my mind (strong move).

30.Nd1  I almost played 30.Nxh3, and the engine will make it seem like Black is okay in this line, despite what your eyes tell you, until you play it out far enough, and then it will change it’s mind.  This is why I think Magnus, or a similar strong human, could still win games/endgames against an engine.  It’s not that a person can’t play stronger than a computer, it’s that a computer makes fewer mistakes.

I know I’ve pointed this sort of thing out many times in the past, but if you pick a line, play it twenty moves deep with an engine (not just Monte-Carlo shootouts), you’ll see that Black is winning after the queen trade.

Even at G/90, 30 second increment, it’s not a lot of time to play a chess game against a strong player.  By the end of the game, I was playing on the increment and Paul had around 16 minutes remaining.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.30”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Paul Covington”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1831”]
[GameNo “-1”]
[WhiteElo “1834”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. c3 Nc6 4. d4 d5 5. e5 cxd4 6. cxd4 Bd7 7. Nc3 Rc8 8. Be3
Be7 9. Bd3 a6 10. O-O h5 11. Qd2 h4 12. Rad1 h3 13. g3 Nh6 14. Bb1 Na5 15. Ne1
Nc4 16. Qe2 b5 17. a3 b4 18. axb4 Bxb4 19. Nd3 Bxc3 20. bxc3 Nxe3 21. fxe3
Rxc3 22. Qd2 Rc7 23. Qa5 Bb5 24. Rc1 Rc4 25. Qxd8+ Kxd8 26. Nf2 Nf5 27. Bxf5
exf5 28. Rxc4 Bxc4 29. Rb1 Kc7 30. Nd1 Rb8 31. Ra1 Rb3 32. Kf2 g5 33. Ke1 Kb6
34. Kd2 a5 35. Kc2 f4 36. gxf4 gxf4 37. Rb1 a4 38. Nb2 Kb5 39. Nxc4 Kxc4 40.
Ra1 Rc3+ 41. Kd2 fxe3+ 42. Ke2 a3 43. Kf3 Kxd4 44. Kf4 e2 45. Re1 Kd3 46. Kf5
Kd2 47. Ra1 e1=Q 48. Rxe1 Kxe1 49. Kf6 Rf3+ 50. Ke7 d4 0-1

Advertisements

Friday night quick-rated

Round 1

9…Na5  Considered 9…Qa5, but didn’t play it.  Was feeling nervous in this game, as I hadn’t settled into the time control.

10…Nxc4??  Considered playing the line which looked more solid, 10…dxe, 11.QxQ RxQ, 12.Bxc5 Nxc4, but realized that was only equal.  I had hoped this line would be better, and didn’t blunder-check it successfully.  I thought after Qa4, I would play Nc2+ fork, but of course the queen can capture backwards.  I was rattled after hanging the piece, wondering how I could find a way to play on, and so dropped the rook while I was sort of distracted with this thought.

Round 2

I missed a mate in 1 on move 11, saw after I instantly retreated my bishop.

Round 3

17…QxQ?  I felt that I could win his knight, but my brain could somehow only consider it’s first thought, which was 17…QxN, 18.Rd5 Qf6, 19.RxB, which isn’t what I wanted but stare as I might found nothing else.  The engine said this is +3, so I figured, oh, it must be 18…BxB in that line, hitting his queen – yep, that was it.

This game went on for a lot of more moves.  In a completely winning position, I had taken a pawn with my king, and the knight could stop the other two paws, but I need to defend my passed pawn with my king.  Instead, I realized I couldn’t do it with my knight and forced the draw, not even realizing that after I just took his pawn there were only two of his pawns left, not three.  It’s like my brain couldn’t keep up from the stress, had 20 seconds left.  He pointed out the simple win, as soon as the game ended.

Round 4

8.a3  As soon as my hand had reached the a3 square with the pawn, I realized I could have won her piece with 8.Qa4+, and mentioned this to her after the game – she had seen it, too.

In the final position, I realized after the game that Nb5 was winning another pawn, and the game, had it earlier as well.  With 12 seconds left on my clock, she was happy to take the draw due to the position.

I’ll include this here, since the blitz results were never posted from Tuesday’s Speed Championship.  I did horrible in the blitz on Tuesday, not on the board so much as on the clock.  Afterward, four of us played in a quad at G/9, which I won all three games against Alexander B., Mike, and Mark.  Blitz is easy to know how to play, in some way, because you are not writing down moves, so just know the mode to go into.  Quick-chess, I write down my moves, so it feels like a regular game, but then I don’t know how to budget my time in round 1.  This also happens with G/70 Inc/30, that also feels weird, finding a pace for that time-control.

 

 

Fearfulness

Round 3, Strong Swiss

Chess must be the sport where amazing psychology that takes place.

So, I got to the club about a minute or two before 7pm, when the rounds start.  Mark was on the pairing sheet, but hadn’t yet arrived.  I set up, filled in my scoresheet once the round started, punched the clock and waited.  Mark arrived over half an hour late, and was down to 62 minutes left on the clock when he sat down to play.  I was expecting 1.e4, but saw 1.d4, so figured he was likely to choose the Catalan.

I tried to focus only on my own clock, because it was my time that mattered.  It’s funny, sometimes I would spend 3 minutes on a move, and then remind myself that it was okay to move because it would be like I had thought about it for over ten minutes on Mark’s clock, and then a further 3 minutes or so on my own clocks, so it was really more like 15 minutes that I spent on the move!

When mark played 13.Nc3??, I had an hour and seven minutes remaining.  I saw that I was winning a piece after about a minute, and figured correctly that he must have blundered seeing only the Qb3 pin.  But then, I got paranoid that he must have had a reason for blundering the piece, like trying to win my Nd7.  Of course, I could see that he had simply dropped it for a pawn, so spent 5 minutes on the move, far too much time, and for no good reason objectively other than for the fact that when someone drops a piece, you can realize how stupid you will look if you don’t win, and then that can translate into this irrational fear.

This game was the opposite of nearly all my other games for the situation that I was in.  So, for example, when I was down to 41 minutes, Mark had 41 seconds remaining.  I realized the irony of how I am usually the one in his position.  Anyway, my irrational and panicky fear got me under 20 minutes by the end of the game, and of course Mark was gaining time, because I wanted to be super quadruple-check sure on my moves, since he naturally could of resigned at any given moment but hadn’t.

I didn’t know whether Mark’s rating was above or below mine, wasn’t concerned about that, but was happy to get the win!  I feel like Mark is up in our head to head series by a couple of games – usually we keep it around 50/50  No, just checked, we were 13 wins, 13 losses, and 15 draws, so I just pulled into +1.  lol.

 

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.01.23”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Mark McGough”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1834”]
[ECO “E03”]
[EventDate “2018.01.23”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1876”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 dxc4 5. Qa4+ Nbd7 6. Qxc4 a6 7. Bg2 b5 8. Qc2
Bb7 9. O-O Rc8 10. a4 c5 11. axb5 axb5 12. dxc5 Bxc5 13. Nc3 b4 14. Qb3 Bxf3
15. Bxf3 bxc3 16. bxc3 O-O 17. Ba3 Qc7 18. Rfd1 Ne5 19. Bg2 Rfd8 20. Rxd8+ Rxd8
21. h3 h6 22. e3 Bxa3 23. Rxa3 Qc4 24. Qb6 Qd3 25. Qa5 Qd1+ 26. Kh2 Nc4 27.
Qxd8+ Qxd8 28. Ra8 Qxa8 29. Bxa8 Nd5 30. g4 Kf8 31. h4 Ke7 32. Kg3 Kd6 33. Bb7
Nxc3 34. Ba6 Nb6 35. Bd3 Nbd5 36. Bc2 Nb4 37. Bb3 Ne4+ 38. Kg2 Nd3 39. Bc4 Ne1+
40. Kf1 Nd2+ 41. Kxe1 Nxc4 42. Ke2 Ke5 43. Kd3 Nb2+ 0-1

Lost in the endgame

Round 3

I saw a lot of right lines, but more significantly in time-pressure chose the wrong ones.  I couldn’t evaluate the endgame correctly, and with under a minute on the clock didn’t even take his b-pawn, though I knew it was hanging.

Hopefully, I can add some analysis here later.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.16”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Rhett Langseth”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1833”]
[ECO “A06”]
[EventDate “2019.01.16”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “2120”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c3 Nf6 3. d4 c5 4. Bf4 Bf5 5. Qb3 Qb6 6. dxc5 Qxb3 7. axb3 Nbd7 8.
b4 e6 9. Na3 Be7 10. Nb5 O-O 11. Nc7 Rac8 12. Rxa7 e5 13. Nxe5 Nh5 14. Nxd7
Nxf4 15. Nxd5 Nxd5 16. Nxf8 Kxf8 17. f3 Ne3 18. g3 Rd8 19. h4 g5 20. h5 g4 21.
Kf2 Bg5 22. f4 Nd1+ 23. Kg1 Bf6 24. Bg2 Nxb2 25. e4 Bc8 26. e5 Be7 27. Kh2 Nd1
28. Ra8 Nxc3 29. Rc1 Nb5 30. c6 bxc6 31. Rxc6 Bd7 32. Rb6 Rxa8 33. Bxa8 Kg7 34.
Rb7 Bc6 35. Rxe7 Bxa8 36. e6 Kf6 37. Rxf7+ Kxe6 38. Rxh7 Kf6 39. h6 Kg6 40. Rh8
Bf3 41. h7 Nd6 42. Rd8 Nf7 43. h8=Q Nxh8 44. Rxh8 Kf5 45. Re8 Bb7 46. Re5+ Kf6
47. b5 Ba8 48. b6 Bb7 49. Rc5 Ke6 50. Rc7 Ba6 51. b7 Bxb7 52. Rxb7 Kf5 53. Rb4
1-0

Friday Night Quick Chess

Round 1

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Dean Brown”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1469”]
[ECO “B27”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1833”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. c3 Bg7 4. d4 cxd4 5. cxd4 d5 6. exd5 Qxd5 7. Nc3 Qd8 8.
Bc4 e6 9. O-O Ne7 10. Bg5 O-O 11. Re1 Nbc6 12. d5 f6 13. dxc6 fxg5 14. Qxd8
Rxd8 15. cxb7 Bxb7 16. Nxg5 Rd6 17. Nxe6 Bxc3 18. bxc3 Bd5 19. Bxd5 Rxd5 20.
Nc7 1-0

Round 2

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Joseph Griffin”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1833”]
[ECO “C68”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1139”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d3 f6 6. Nbd2 Be6 7. c4 Qxd3 8.
Qe2 O-O-O 9. Qxd3 Rxd3 10. O-O Bb4 11. b3 Ne7 12. a3 Bc3 13. Ra2 Rhd8 14. Rd1
Bg4 15. h3 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Rxf3 17. Rc2 Bxd2 18. Rdxd2 Rxd2 19. Rxd2 Rxb3 20. Kg2
Rc3 0-1

Round 3

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Campbell Dobbs”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1744”]
[ECO “B00”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1833”]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. d4 Nc6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O Bd6 7. c4 Qh5 8. h3
Bxh3 9. Ng5 Bg4 10. f3 Bh2+ 11. Kf2 Qh4+ 12. Ke3 Qxg5+ 13. f4 Bxe2 14. Qxe2 Qf6
15. Nc3 Nxd4 16. Ne4 Nxe2 17. Nxf6+ Nxf6 18. Kxe2 O-O-O 19. Rh1 Bg3 20. Rh3 Ne4
21. Kf3 f5 22. Be3 Rd3 23. Re1 Bxe1 0-1

Round 4

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Vedant Margale”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1833”]
[ECO “C77”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1378”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. O-O d6 8. Bg5 h6
9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 Bg4 11. Nc3 Nd4 12. Kh1 Qd7 13. Nd5 Nxd5 14. Bxd5 c6 15. Nxd4
Bxd4 16. Bxc6 Bxd1 17. Bxd7+ Kxd7 18. Raxd1 Bxb2 19. Rb1 Bd4 20. Rb3 Rhc8 21.
Rc1 Rc6 22. c3 Rac8 23. h4 Rxc3 24. Rbxc3 Rxc3 25. Rxc3 Bxc3 26. hxg5 hxg5 27.
Kg1 Kc6 28. Kf1 Kc5 29. Ke2 Kb4 30. f3 Ka3 31. Bf2 Kxa2 32. Bb6 a5 33. Bd8 a4
34. Bxg5 b4 35. Bc1 b3 36. g3 a3 37. Bxa3 Kxa3 38. Kd1 Ka2 39. Ke2 b2 40. f4
b1=Q 41. Kf3 Qd1+ 42. Kg2 Qg4 43. f5 Bd4 44. Kf1 Qf3+ 45. Ke1 Bc3# 0-1

New year, fresh start

Round 1 of the January 2019 Strong Swiss.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.02”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Sam Bridle”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1824”]
[ECO “B00”]
[EventDate “2019.01.02”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1833”]

1. e4 Nc6 2. Nc3 d6 3. f4 Nf6 4. Nf3 e5 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. d3 Qe7 7. O-O g6 8. Nd5
Nxd5 9. exd5 Nb4 10. Bxd7+ Qxd7 11. fxe5 O-O-O 12. Ng5 dxe5 13. Nxf7 Bc5+ 14.
Kh1 Qxd5 15. Nxd8 Qxd8 16. a3 Nd5 17. Qg4+ Kb8 18. Bg5 Qd6 19. Rae1 h6 20. Bd2
g5 21. Qe4 Re8 22. b4 Bd4 23. Qxd4 1-0