Strong Swiss – Round 2

Round 2

Bill was about 45 minutes late, so it was probably inevitable that he would get into time-pressure.

Mark and Sam drew, so they are both standing at 1.5 points, going into the final round.

We got into a delayed exchange variation, which I am not up on how to play as Black.  Instead of recapturing on e5 with the knight, he captured with the pawn, allowing a trade of queens.

The middle-game got more spicy than I was expecting; Bill played really well, striving for tactical complications.  Once Bill was in time-pressure, I felt I caught a break, since he could have exchanged rooks, and instead kept them on, which is probably what gave Black a decisive advantage at the end.

6…Nxe4  The easiest move to try to deal with, at the board.  6…Bd6, 7.d4 Nxe4, 8.dxe5 Bc5, 9.QxQ KxQ is =+.  6…Qd6, 7.d4 Bg4, 8.c3 is += (8.dxe QxQ, 9.RxQ Ne4 is =+).

7.Nc5  7…Nd6 and 7…Nf6 are also solid here.  7…Nf6 would be my second choice, particularly if a draw is okay.

8…Ne6  Better calculation, OTB, would have revealed that 8…e4 is indeed possible, but it’s just another position after 9.Nc3 Be7, 10.Nxe4 NxN, 11.RxN =.

9.dxe5 I guess this move is personal preference.  He said he wanted to overwhelm me positionally, when playing this move.

11…b6.  Stockfish has the rather remarkable idea of playing 11…Nf8 here, with the formation of …Bf5, and then knight back to e6 in mind.

13…Bb7  Stockfish’s preference was to play 13…b5, 14.Bb2 b4, 15.Nd2 Bb7, not so much better, as it is obviously shutting down White’s play more.

I figured the game would continue 28.RxR fxR, but this position is a lot more complex than probably both of us realized – not sure what he was thinking here, either, since we didn’t look at the final position during the post-mortem.

15…Nd4  Super-tempting for a human to play this way, but 15…Bg5, 16.Nd5 0-0-0! (+1, for Black, or -1) is much more of a positional grip.

16…Bd8.  I noticed in time that 16…Rc8?? fails to 17.RxN exR, 18.NxBe7.

20…0-0?  My intuition told me that this was likely a mistake, but I couldn’t see why after a reasonable amount of time spent thinking.  20…c6 is more accurate here because the Nf6+ move is not available, as it will be after castling.  with …c6, Black will have ideas of …h5, …Rh6, ….a5.

25…Rad8?  The last few moves have only helped Black, and here it is a mistake to allow this trade of rooks, as I pointed out to him after the game.  Instead, …h6 is a good move to cut out back-rank threats (even though it appears positionally risky as a target), and then get the rook on the e-file active, attack with it, since the Rf4 is basically out of play, if not sacking on f5.

26…Nd4.  26…h5 makes that Rf4 into more or less an observer.  I considered …h5 on many moves, particularly on this move, but wasn’t sure.  The game ended with my 27 minutes left to his 3 minutes, but still I knew that he would be picking up the pace here, and I was trying not to allow myself to follow him into time-pressure.

28. Resigns (?)  White’s best move here may have been 28.b4! Rxf6, 29.bxc bxc offers practical chances.

If 28.RxR NxR!, 29.RxR is rather forced here NxR, 30.Be5 Nb7!! is the only move that wins, as otherwise White could equalize with Bd6 caging in the Black king, and freezing the queenside.

If 28…fxR, 29.b4! Kf7, 30.bxc bxc, 31.Ba3 e5, 32.Bxc5 Ne6, 33.RxR (forced) NxR, should be a win for Black, up a pawn once …Kxf6 is played, but the win is a long way off, and all three results are still possible from a practical point of view.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.04.17”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Bill Weihmiller”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1962”]
[ECO “C77”]
[EventDate “2019.04.17”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1801”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. O-O Nxe4 7. Re1 Nc5 8.
d4 Ne6 9. dxe5 Qxd1 10. Rxd1 Be7 11. b3 b6 12. Ba3 c5 13. c4 Bb7 14. Nc3 Bxf3
15. gxf3 Nd4 16. Nd5 Bd8 17. Bb2 Nxf3+ 18. Kg2 Nh4+ 19. Kh3 Nf5 20. Rd3 O-O 21.
Rg1 g6 22. Rg4 Re8 23. Rf4 c6 24. Nf6+ Bxf6 25. exf6 Rad8 26. Rff3 Nd4 27. Rfe3
Re6 0-1

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Quick Six – Day 1

Round 1 – bye

I wasn’t able to record moves beyond what I have here.  I lacked precision from move to move, both of my games were an illustration of that.  When it comes to quick-chess, it seems that the word “imprecise” could best describe my game.

Round 2

[Event “Quick Six”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2019.04.16”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Alexander Bozhenov”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1650”]
[GameNo “-1”]
[WhiteElo “1891”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nxc6 Qf6 6. Qf3 Qxf3 7. gxf3
bxc6 8. Be3 Bb6 9. Nc3 Nf6 10. O-O-O O-O 11. Rg1 Re8 12. Bc4 Bb7 13. Rg2 Rad8
14. Bg5 Kf8 15. Bxf6 gxf6 16. Rdg1 d5 17. Bd3 d4 18. Ne2 Ke7 19. f4 Bc8 20. f5
a5 21. Rg7 Rh8 22. f4 c5 23. a4 Rdf8 24. Bc4 Bb7 25. e5 fxe5 26. fxe5 Be4 27.
Ng3 Bf3 28. Rf1 Bg2 29. Rf2 Bh3 30. Ne4 h6 31. Nf6 h5 32. Nh7 c6 33. Ng5 Bg4
34. Bxf7 Kd8 35. Ne6+ Kc8 36. Nxf8 Rxf8 37. Rg8 Rxg8 38. Bxg8 c4 39. f6 d3 40.
f7 Be3+ 41. Rd2 Bh6 42. cxd3 cxd3 43. Kb1 1-0

Round 3

My opponent was a boy, unrated – both him and his dad played.  It seemed from his games that he was able to calculate quite well, or at least when he had to, but he is quite young, and his inexperience showed on the final move.

[Event “Quick Six”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2019.04.16”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Johnathan Brown”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C30”]
[EventDate “2019.04.16”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1650”]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 Nc6 3. Nf3 exf4 4. d4 d5 5. e5 Bf5 6. Bxf4 Nb4 7. Na3 a6 8. c3
Nc6 9. Nc2 Qe7 10. Ne3 Be4 11. Bd3 O-O-O 12. O-O f6 13. Qc2 Bxf3 14. Rxf3 fxe5
15. Bf5+ Kb8 16. dxe5 Nxe5 17. Rf2 Nf6 18. Rd1 Nh5 19. Nxd5 Qe8 20. Bxe5 Qxe5
21. Re2 Bc5+ 22. Kh1 Qd6 23. b4 Bb6 24. Re6 Qf8 25. Nxb6 Rxd1+ 26. Qxd1 Qxf5
27. Nd7+ Ka7 28. Qd4+ Ka8 29. Nc5 Nf4 30. Qe4 Nxe6 31. Qxb7# 1-0

 

Friday Quick Chess

For this post, I’m listing the players ratings by their published quick-chess rating.

I was glad that I decided to play in this tournament, not only because I got a new opponent, and only play some opponents in this venue, but it reminds me that people who play chess at clubs play a lot more correctly than players typically do in on-line blitz, which is more about training, experimentation, and not about prize-money either.

Round 1

[Event “Friday Quick”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.04.05”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Joseph Griffin”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1176”]
[ECO “B12”]
[EventDate “2019.04.05”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 3”]
[WhiteElo “1669”]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. f3 e6 4. Nc3 c5 5. Be3 cxd4 6. Qxd4 Nc6 7. Bb5 Bd7 8. Bxc6
bxc6 9. exd5 cxd5 10. Nge2 Nf6 11. O-O Be7 12. g4 h6 13. Kh1 Qc7 14. Rad1 a5
15. a4 Rc8 16. Qb6 Bc5 17. Bxc5 Qxc5 18. Qxc5 Rxc5 19. Nd4 O-O 20. Rfe1 Rb8 21.
Ndb5 Bxb5 22. axb5 Nd7 23. Rd4 Nb6 24. f4 Rc4 25. Rxc4 Nxc4 26. b3 Nd6 27. Ra1
Nxb5 28. Nxb5 Rxb5 29. Kg2 Rc5 30. Ra2 Kf8 31. Kf2 Ke7 32. Ke3 Kd6 33. Kd4 f6
34. c4 e5+ 35. fxe5+ fxe5+ 36. Kd3 dxc4+ 37. bxc4 Ke6 38. Rb2 g6 39. Kc3 Kf6
40. h4 h5 41. Rb6+ Kf7 42. g5 e4 43. Kd4 Rc7 44. Ra6 e3 45. Rxa5 e2 46. Ra1 Re7
47. Re1 Ke8 48. Kd3 Kd7 49. Rxe2 Kd6 50. Rxe7 Kxe7 1-0

Round 2

[Event “Friday Quick”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.04.05”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Christopher Motley”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1669”]
[ECO “C29”]
[EventDate “2019.04.05”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1526”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 d5 4. fxe5 Nxe4 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. Bb5 Bg4 7. d3 Nxc3 8.
bxc3 a6 9. Bxc6+ bxc6 10. a4 Be7 11. O-O O-O 12. d4 Qd7 13. Qd3 f6 14. Bf4 Qf5
15. exf6 Bxf6 16. Bxc7 Qxd3 17. cxd3 Ra7 18. Bb6 Rb7 19. a5 Re8 20. Rae1 Rbe7
21. Bc5 Re2 22. Ne5 Bxe5 23. dxe5 g6 24. Rxe2 Bxe2 25. Rf6 Rxe5 26. Rxc6 Bxd3
27. Rc8+ Kf7 28. Rc7+ Kg8 29. Bd4 Rf5 30. h3 Rf7 31. Rc8+ Rf8 32. Rc7 Rf7 33.
Rc8+ Rf8 34. Rc7 Rf7 1/2-1/2

Round 3

I had fallen into this same opening trap before, but it wasn’t on my mind and was probably a different move-order.  This well seasoned older gentleman started the game with a Reti, in order to get a reversed Gruenfeld.  I considered playing …Ne7 (Ne2 is a common Gruenfeld move, to avoid …Bg4, or Bg5 in this case).  Either way, I was planning on doubling my rooks, which was holdable, but found this pretty looking …Bh4?? move, except that it doesn’t work.

[Event “Friday Quick”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.04.05”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Roger Martin”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1669”]
[ECO “A08”]
[EventDate “2019.04.05”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “2100”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 c5 3. Bg2 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 e5 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. O-O Nf6 8.
c4 Be7 9. Nc3 Be6 10. Qa4 Qd7 11. Rd1 Rd8 12. Bg5 O-O 13. Rac1 h6 14. Bxf6 Bxf6
15. cxd5 cxd5 16. Qxd7 Rxd7 17. Bxd5 Bxd5 18. Nxd5 Bg5 19. f4 exf4 20. gxf4 Bh4
21. Nf6+ Bxf6 22. Rxd7 Bxb2 23. Rc4 Ra8 24. Rcc7 f5 25. Kg2 a5 26. Rd5 a4 27.
Rxf5 a3 28. Rb5 Rd8 29. Kf3 Rd1 30. Rc2 Ra1 31. Rbxb2 axb2 32. Rxb2 Rh1 33. a4
Rxh2 34. a5 Rh5 35. Ra2 Rb5 36. a6 Rb8 37. a7 Ra8 38. Ke4 Kf7 39. Kd5 h5 40.
Kc6 Kf6 41. Kb7 Rh8 42. a8=Q Rxa8 43. Rxa8 Kf5 44. Rg8 g6 45. Kc6 Kxf4 46. Kd5
h4 47. e4 h3 48. Rh8 Kg3 49. e5 g5 50. e6 g4 51. e7 h2 52. e8=Q Kg2 53. Qe2+
Kg1 54. Qxh2+ Kf1 55. Rf8+ Ke1 56. Rf2 Kd1 57. Qg1# 1-0

Round 4

16.NxBd7?  Total time-pressure move.  I considered playing 16.g3, but didn’t spot the tactic of 16…fxg??, 17.RxNf6 winning a piece.  If 17…KxR, 18.Ne4+ wins the Bb4, and if say 17…BxNc3, then 18.Rxf7+ and recaptures on c3.

[Event “Friday Quick”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.04.05”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Cameron Stark”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1507”]
[ECO “C36”]
[EventDate “2019.04.05”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1669”]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 d5 3. exd5 exf4 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bc4 Bd6 6. Qe2+ Qe7 7. Qxe7+ Kxe7
8. O-O Re8 9. Nc3 Bd7 10. d4 Kf8 11. Bd2 h6 12. Rae1 g5 13. Ne5 Re7 14. a4 a6
15. Bd3 Bb4 16. Nxd7+ Nbxd7 17. Bf5 Nb6 18. b3 Nbxd5 19. Nxd5 Nxd5 20. Bxb4
Nxb4 21. h3 Nd5 22. Bh7 Ne3 23. Rf2 Rae8 24. Rfe2 Kg7 25. Bd3 c6 26. Kf2 Kf6
27. g3 fxg3+ 28. Kxg3 Nf5+ 29. Kf2 Rxe2+ 30. Rxe2 Rxe2+ 31. Kxe2 Nxd4+ 32. Ke3
c5 33. Be4 b6 34. Bd3 a5 35. Bh7 Ke5 36. Bd3 f5 37. Kf2 Kf4 38. Kg2 h5 39. Kf2
g4 40. hxg4 fxg4 41. Kg2 h4 0-1

Lost Composure

Round 1, Strong Swiss

When Mark is on, performance-wise, I’d say he is my toughest club opponent.  Mark has been playing more chess than I have, he’s been like an animal lately, playing in Tuesdays (yesterdays two G/45, d/10), Wednesday’s Strong Swiss, Friday’s quick chess.

This time, Mark stayed ahead of me on the clock, and I was the one having trouble keeping up, making moves for sake of time and regretting them.  I was trying to stick around just as much as I was trying to play the board.  I was playing on the increment for a while, hence mysterious moves like Kf1, which was basically a pre-move.

39.BxNc6??  I told myself that I can do anything but capture the knight, releasing the tension, but did it anyway.  39.Bc4? also fails to Ne7, for one, as he showed in the post-mortem.  The only explanation for not playing 39.Ba6, which I had considered, was time-pressure and nerves.  After I took on c6, I realized that I was simply going to be down two pawns, and then instantly played that hideous last move, somehow hoping he would blunder (he has under 2 minutes by this point), but I saw the …QxQc2 almost as soon as I had played it, and resigned once he made the move.

We looked at 39.Ba6 in the post-mortem, once repeating with …Rd8, Bb5 Rc8 before the next time he tried 39…Re8.  I played 40.Bb5 (40.Bc4 Be6 – …BxB is best), Re6 41.Qd3 idea is winning, but I didn’t see this.  The number of variations and tries for Black is rather fantastic, lots of slippery tries with …Qa8 and …Qc8-Qa6+, but first would happen 41…Ba2, 42.Ba4, threatening 43.Qd2, trapping the bishop.  I think I was just feeling overwhelmed, having had a cup of coffee, rather than a soda before the game, which I had been drinking more recently, and wasn’t ready for the blitz battle finale.  I was in a more mellow mood than the situation required.  I could have taken more time on my last two moves, but was rattled by that point.  This is part of clock-management, keeping time to steady one’s nerves, but sometimes, or frequently, games still turns out this way.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.04.03”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Mark McGough”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1821”]
[ECO “B01”]
[EventDate “2019.04.03”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1962”]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. d4 c6 5. c4 Qa5+ 6. Bd2 Qc7 7. Nc3 Bf5 8.
Be2 e6 9. O-O Nbd7 10. Rc1 Bd6 11. Re1 O-O 12. c5 Bf4 13. g3 Bxd2 14. Qxd2 Rad8
15. b4 e5 16. d5 cxd5 17. Nb5 Qb8 18. Nd6 Ne4 19. Qxd5 Nxd6 20. cxd6 Be6 21.
Qd2 Nb6 22. Red1 f6 23. a3 Bb3 24. Re1 Rxd6 25. Qe3 Bf7 26. Rc5 Rc8 27. Rec1
Rdc6 28. Qd2 Rd8 29. Qe3 Rdc8 30. Bb5 Rxc5 31. bxc5 Qc7 32. Qc3 Nd5 33. Qb2 Ne7
34. Nd2 b6 35. c6 Nf5 36. Ne4 Ne7 37. Qc2 Bd5 38. Kf1 Nxc6 39. Bxc6 Qxc6 40.
Nd6 Qxc2 0-1

The March grind is over

Final round of Strong Swiss

I skipped a couple of tournaments in March, so that I would only be playing every other weekend in a tournament, instead of every weekend, in addition to Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Next month there will be Strong Swiss on Wednesdays, and then the Denver Open at the end of April, which includes a star-studded cast of GMs, IMs, WGMs, Masters, Experts.  Playing in the championship section should almost guarantee that at least one of your games will be found in a database one day.  Of course, my modest goal for that tournament would be to make Expert (got to find those rating points somewhere).  😉

I’ll put some pre-engine notes in here, firstly.

8.h3  I’m not a huge fan of this move.  The move b4 controls c5, prevents Black’s pieces from going there, but that’s all it’s doing at the moment.  It seems that 8.a4 would be a logical strategic move because b4 can’t just be standing there without more of a plan behind it, it wants to go to b5, and has to be part of some long-term strategy.  My guess is that he was simply used to opponents trading the e5 pawn for the b4 pawn on move two.

9.a3  This seems like the sensible responsible, but 9.axb would be the easy way out.  If he had played 8.a4, then he would have cohesive 9.b5.  Instead, here 9.b5 cxb, 10.Nc3 b4, 11.Nd5 NxN, 12.BxN would just be sad.

12.c3  This was a clever way out of his predicament.  12.Bc3 would invite 12…Na6, among other moves.  The pawn sac 12.Nc3 Qxb, 13.Qb1 QxQ, 14.RxQ isn’t the type of game that White was looking for either.  It sucks for White to be spending time determining the lesser of the evils in the opening, not the type of game White was looking for, I’d say.

13.Qa4  White is trying to prevent Black’s idea of 13…Qa2, 14.Bb2 Qa2, which would win a piece.  Black wasn’t winning a piece with 12…Qa3 first, as I mentioned after the game, because then the pieces could be defended with a Bb2, Qc1, Na3 formation.

14…Na6.  I strongly considered playing 14…Qa6, 15.QxQ NxQ here, as Black’s advantage isn’t going anywhere.  Actually, at the board I was mainly looking at the 15…BxQ recapture.

18…d5  18…Be6 could be met by 19.Qc2.

19.d3  I was glad to see this, as the move c4 is the shoe that Black doesn’t want to see fall.  c4 can’t be met by d4.  Playing d3, just to prevent say …Ne4, seems a bit unnecessary.  Sure, …Ne4-g5 is an idea, but White should be more concerned with his own structure and initiative, or at least I would be.

20.d4?!  This struck me as a bit crazy, since the d4 square should be used for one of his knights, after trading pawns here.  Plus, he’s killing his Bb2.

20…h5?  I wasn’t sure where to place the Nc7, or when, and so equivocated by making this move.  He thought a long time, which allowed me to see how strong that 21.c4 could be, even though it was the move I had feared before playing my move.  This is poor form on my part, allowing him to make the decision in this position, where precision defense is required of Black.  For example 21.c4 Na6 ( and actually the best defense is 21…dxc, 22.Nxc4 Qa7, 23.Ne5 Qb6, 24.Nc4 offering a positional draw, so better is 23…Qa4!, 24.QxQ RxQ targeting the b4 pawn, and after …Nfd4 that b4 pawn should drop, due to his poor piece placement, due to lack of space and Black’s pieces staring at their own pawns.) 22.c5 Qd8, 23.b5 Nc7, 24.bxc bxc, 25.Qb7, which is definitely not what Black would like to see.  The thing to keep in mind is the absence of the rook pair, which serve to defend back-ranks more effortlessly.

22.Ra1  He should swap off knights here, as 22.NxN bxN is more optical than real, and 23…QxN, which I was planning on playing, can be met by 24.Bf1 Qb6.  Trading the knights does a favor for both of us, but it also lets his rook get to a1.  If the heavies come off, I am trying to play against his bad bishop on b2, but the position has a good chance of ending in a fortress draw in that case, so I’d have to realistically move my rook off of the a-file, giving White some initiative.

26…Qf6.  26…dxc? was the instant temptation, until you realize that his hope is to then free his Bc3 with 27.d5!

27.cxd?!  I was glad to see this.  I thought that White should play 27.c5 here, gaining more space (if it’s a fortress, then okay White is playing for a draw anyhow), but he didn’t have so much faith in the defense of his kingside, where I could see that the simple Ng1 move could stymie Black’s attack.

28.Nc3  This move struck me as rather insane, but he was in time-pressure (and thus he was dragging me down on the clock, as well, with him!)  White should take the opportunity to play 28.b5! to get his dark-square bishop into play.  Obviously, I had also lost the thread of the position over the last two moves.

30.Nc2?  Shocking.  Why is he not playing 30.Na3-b5(?)  It’s understandable why this game frustrated him, since it came down to time-pressure moves.  He actually spent enough time here, though, so I can’t understand unless he typically plays more passively in time-pressure than with his normal game.  Perhaps he saw the plan played in the game, thinking he was winning my d5 pawn (else trading rooks), but not seeing that line deeply enough to realize that it doesn’t work.

39…Rc6.  Here, I saw 39…Bf1, 40.Ng2 BxN, 41.KxB, but kept missing …Be6.  We were both  playing on either the increment, or my clock.  The fact that he played so quickly, and defensively, caused me to come close to making a blunder, in that sense, but objectively here there is nothing to see, besides finding the obvious plan.

My post tournament rating improved to 1962.

 

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.03.27”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Sam Bridle”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1949”]
[ECO “A00”]
[EventDate “2019.03.27”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1880”]

1. b4 e5 2. Bb2 d6 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 g6 5. e3 Bg7 6. Ne2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. h3 a5
9. a3 axb4 10. axb4 Rxa1 11. Bxa1 Qb6 12. c3 Bf5 13. Qa4 Bd3 14. Re1 Na6 15.
Na3 Ra8 16. Nc1 Nc7 17. Qb3 Bf5 18. Bb2 d5 19. d3 e4 20. d4 h5 21. Ne2 Nb5 22.
Ra1 Nd6 23. Qc2 Nh7 24. Kh2 Qd8 25. Qd1 Bh6 26. c4 Qf6 27. cxd5 cxd5 28. Nc3
Be6 29. Qe2 Ng5 30. Nc2 Rc8 31. Ra5 Nc4 32. Ra2 Nxb2 33. Nxd5 Bxd5 34. Rxb2 Bc4
35. Qd2 Nf3+ 36. Bxf3 Qxf3 37. Ne1 Qf5 38. Rc2 b5 39. Rb2 Rc6 40. Kg2 Rf6 41.
Qc1 Ra6 42. Rc2 Bf8 43. Qd2 Be6 44. h4 Qh3+ 45. Kg1 Bg4 46. f4 Qxg3+ 47. Ng2
Ra1+ 48. Rc1 Rxc1+ 49. Qxc1 Bf3 50. Qc2 Qxg2+ 51. Qxg2 Bxg2 52. Kxg2 Bxb4 0-1

Battle of the bishops

Final Round

It’s strikes one as a little odd that my rating is, for the first time, is listed as higher than Paul’s.  Actually, Paul’s “live” rating is higher, as he upset a 2300+ player in the previous round.  After 44 games between us, I had 8 wins versus 36 losses against Paul, with no draws!  So, it’s sort of like a goal of mine to draw Paul, particularly with the Black pieces.

I’ll comment without seeing the engine evals, first.

8…Rc8  This is a little premature.  In the post-mortem, I said that I should have traded pawns here on d4.  Yes, trading pawns opens the e-file for Black, but it also means that my bishop isn’t as likely to need to return to b7 at some point.

9…Be7  I should perhaps trade pawns here, and can even play …Bd6, but I was getting relatively low on time, having spent time and energy looking for advantageous continuations, and was okay with putting up a general fight here, with a draw as a good result.

11…h6  This was to slow down the White plan of e4, Ng5, Ng5xe4, so it was chosen on more general considerations.

12…Ne4  Okay, probably not best, but I didn’t have the time and energy to make up my mind, or find and blundercheck something else.  I didn’t want to move my queen off of the d-file, and considered …Nf6-e8-d6, but it’s kind of slow, since the knight is well posted stopping the immediate e4 from where it is.  Perhaps …Nh7 (threatening ….f5) either here or after …Re8 is another possibility.  I was struggling to find a move/plan here that I liked.  I figured that the move played should at least not be losing.

16.c4  Paul wanted to play 17.Qc2, but probably should have tried 17.Qg4 here, to preserve the queens, and attack the e4 pawn immediately.

28.Bd1  If 28.b4 cxb, 29.axb a3, 30.b5 Bb7, 32.b3 looks like a draw.  So, perhaps an improvement is, well I saw this OTB, but only now remember calculating it.  28.b4 cxb, 29.axb a3, 30.b5 a2, 31.Bc3 Bb4, 32.Bb1 Bb7 with a threat of ….Be1, but Kg2 might hold.  I don’t know the eval, but he never went for it.

28…axb3.  He thought, and at first I had thought as well of 28…b5, but it drops a pawn after 29.cxb Bxb, 30.bxa3 Bd3 perhaps there is still something there for the pawn, but I didn’t see it with my clock time.

35.a4   If 35.Kf4, I was planning on playing 35…f5 (capturing it e.p. would be illegal), and I felt confident that I could still draw this position, even though the base of my pawn chain would then be the more vulnerable e6 pawn.  In any case, he chose not to go for it.

Now for Stockfish’s analysis:

10…c4 instead of …0-0.  This is one of the moves that appealed to me, but for where I was on the clock, not even having castled yet, I wasn’t sure about what would become of a race, after 11…e4.

14…Nd2 instead of …Ne5 (they are neck and neck).  After 15…f5, I did well with this move in the post-mortem.

15…c4 instead of 15…Bb7  This is the move that Paul suggested in the post-mortem, and I didn’t see it here.  I wasn’t thrilled about playing …Bb7, but for the sake of clock-time saved, I kind of was.

18…h5?!  This move was a bit of a mistake, but on the clock it wasn’t.  It stops his obvious threat of rounding up my e4 pawn with his king and bishop.  One thing I’ve learned from studying the endgame is that sometimes you have to have some cajones and make pro-active moves.  Sitting around passively in the endgame, waiting to find out what pops up next can be a recipe for disaster, as you lose more space and time.

19.Rxd1  I would just like to add that at the board, right after my quick move, I felt that this was a mistake, as I could have played …Kg8-h7-h6, defending the h5 pawn, before trading rooks.

20…Rd8   20…Bc6 is an even better idea that I missed; then, I can trade the last pair of  rooks when I decide to.

28.Bd1  In the 28.b4 line, I correctly saw that I could push a pawn to a3 (not pushing it farther), and play …Bb7 as I stated in the post-mortem that I didn’t believe his king could afford to cross the board, to scoop up that advanced pawn.

After 35.Kf4 both 35…f5 and 35…Kh5 (what he thought I would play) were equally drawn.  I even saw what to do in that 35….Kh5 line correctly, to oppose his king with mine.

So, all in all, the game was quite a fair result!  🙂

Perhaps the most comical part of this is that I put this tournament in the rating estimator, and before this game it puts my new rating at 1950, but because I drew Paul it dropped me to 1949.  lol.  How ignominious of a rating system to do that.

Next month, there is no regular-rated tournament on Tuesdays at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  Well, there is regular-rated, for the first two weeks of the month, but it’s a dual-rated G/45 tournament, which I can only have little interest in, at this point, as I at least have some interest in a possible run at making Expert.

[Event “March Swiss”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2019.03.26”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Paul Anderson”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1942”]
[ECO “D00”]
[EventDate “2019.03.26”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1934”]

1. d4 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. Nf3 c5 5. e3 Nc6 6. O-O b6 7. b3 Ba6 8. Re1 Rc8
9. a3 Be7 10. Bb2 O-O 11. Nbd2 h6 12. Rc1 Ne4 13. Nxe4 dxe4 14. Ne5 Nxe5 15.
dxe5 Bb7 16. c4 Qxd1 17. Rexd1 Rfd8 18. h4 h5 19. Bf1 Rxd1 20. Rxd1 Rd8 21. Be2
Rxd1+ 22. Bxd1 g6 23. Kg2 Kg7 24. Kh3 Kh6 25. Bc3 a5 26. Be2 Bc6 27. Bd2 a4 28.
Bd1 axb3 29. Bxb3 Bd8 30. Bc3 Bc7 31. g4 hxg4+ 32. Kxg4 Bd8 33. Bc2 Bc7 34. Bd1
Bb8 35. a4 Bc7 36. Bc2 Bb7 37. Bd1 Bc6 38. Kh3 Bb7 39. Kg2 Bc6 40. Kh3 Bb7 41.
Kg2 Bc6 42. Kh3 1/2-1/2

2019 Colorado Senior Championship

Saturday

Round 1

[Event “2019 Colorado Senior Championship”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.03.23”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Buck Buchanan”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1907”]
[ECO “A21”]
[EventDate “2019.03.23”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “2014”]

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Bb4 3. g3 Bxc3 4. bxc3 Ne7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. d3 Nbc6 7. Nf3 d6 8.
O-O f6 9. Qc2 Be6 10. Rb1 b6 11. a4 Qd7 12. Rd1 Kh8 13. Ba3 Rad8 14. Nd2 Na5
15. e3 c5 16. Bb2 d5 17. cxd5 Bxd5 18. e4 Bc6 19. Ra1 Qxd3 20. Qxd3 Rxd3 21.
Bf1 Rd6 22. Nc4 Nxc4 23. Bxc4 Rfd8 24. Rxd6 Rxd6 25. f3 Rd2 26. Ba3 Nc8 27. Bb3
a5 28. Rd1 Rxd1+ 29. Bxd1 Kg8 30. Kf2 Kf8 31. Ke3 Ke7 32. Kd3 Nd6 33. Bc1 Bb7
34. Be3 Ba6+ 35. Kc2 Kd7 36. Bf2 Kc6 37. Bg1 Nb7 38. Bf2 Bf1 39. Be3 c4 40. Bf2
Nc5 41. Kd2 Bd3 42. Bg1 Bb1 43. Bf2 Ba2 44. Bxc5 Kxc5 45. Kc1 Bb3 46. Bxb3 cxb3
47. Kb2 b5 48. Kxb3 bxa4+ 49. Kxa4 Kc4 50. Kxa5 Kxc3 51. Kb5 Kd3 52. Kc5 Ke3
53. Kd6 Kxf3 54. Kd5 h5 55. Ke6 Kxe4 56. Kf7 f5 57. Kxg7 f4 58. gxf4 Kxf4 59.
Kg6 Kg4 60. h3+ Kxh3 61. Kxh5 Kg3 62. Kg5 Kf3 63. Kf5 e4 0-1

 

Round 2

[Event “2019 Colorado Senior Championship”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.03.23”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Earl Wikle”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1907”]
[ECO “A25”]
[EventDate “2019.03.23”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “2013”]

1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Nd5 O-O 6. e3 Re8 7. Ne2 Nxd5 8.
cxd5 Ne7 9. a3 Bc5 10. b4 Bb6 11. Bb2 d6 12. f4 f6 13. Rc1 c6 14. dxc6 Nxc6 15.
O-O d5 16. b5 Na5 17. fxe5 fxe5 18. d4 Nc4 19. Qb3 Bg4 20. Bf3 Bxf3 21. Rxf3
Nd2 0-1

 

Sunday

Day 2 was a disappointment compared to day 1.  Brian Wall ended my 21 game unbeaten streak in round 4.  My rating improved to a personal best of 1942, although I’d like it to reach 1950 if not Expert.  People who have made Expert, can always say that they achieved that.

Round 3

[Event “2019 Colorado Senior Championship”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.03.24”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Ron Rossi”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1940”]
[ECO “C30”]
[EventDate “2019.03.24”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1907”]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. c3 Bg4 5. Bc4 Qe7 6. d3 Nc6 7. b4 Nxb4 8. cxb4
Bxf3 9. Qa4+ c6 10. bxc5 Bxg2 11. Rg1 Qh4+ 12. Kd1 Bf3+ 13. Kc2 Qxh2+ 14. Nd2
Qxg1 15. Nxf3 Qf2+ 16. Nd2 Nf6 17. Rb1 Rb8 18. fxe5 dxe5 19. Qxc6+ bxc6 20.
Rxb8+ Kd7 21. Rxh8 Qxc5 22. Nb3 Qf2+ 23. Bd2 Ng4 24. Rf8 Ne3+ 25. Kc3 Nxc4 26.
Kxc4 h5 27. Rb8 Kc7 28. Ra8 h4 29. Ba5+ Kb7 30. Rd8 Qxa2 31. Kb4 Qb2 32. Ka4
Qc2 33. Kb4 Qb2 34. Ka4 1/2-1/2

Round 4

[Event “2019 Colorado Senior Championship”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.03.24”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Brian Wall”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “2203”]
[ECO “B31”]
[EventDate “2019.03.24”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1907”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 Nf6 6. c3 O-O 7. d4 cxd4 8. cxd4
d5 9. e5 Ne4 10. Nc3 Nxc3 11. bxc3 Na5 12. Bg5 a6 13. Bd3 Be6 14. Qe2 Rc8 15.
Rec1 Nc4 16. a4 Qd7 17. Ra2 Rc6 18. Nd2 f6 19. exf6 exf6 20. Bf4 Re8 21. Nxc4
dxc4 22. Bc2 Bg4 23. Qf1 Be2 24. Qe1 Bd3 25. Qd1 Bxc2 26. Qxc2 Rce6 27. h3 Bf8
28. Qb1 g5 29. Be3 Bd6 30. Ra1 Bb8 31. Qf5 Qd6 32. g3 Rxe3 33. fxe3 Qxg3+ 34.
Kf1 Rxe3 35. Qg4 Rf3+ 36. Ke2 Qf2+ 37. Kd1 Rd3# 0-1