Lost in the endgame

Round 3

I saw a lot of right lines, but more significantly in time-pressure chose the wrong ones.  I couldn’t evaluate the endgame correctly, and with under a minute on the clock didn’t even take his b-pawn, though I knew it was hanging.

Hopefully, I can add some analysis here later.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.16”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Rhett Langseth”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1833”]
[ECO “A06”]
[EventDate “2019.01.16”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “2120”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c3 Nf6 3. d4 c5 4. Bf4 Bf5 5. Qb3 Qb6 6. dxc5 Qxb3 7. axb3 Nbd7 8.
b4 e6 9. Na3 Be7 10. Nb5 O-O 11. Nc7 Rac8 12. Rxa7 e5 13. Nxe5 Nh5 14. Nxd7
Nxf4 15. Nxd5 Nxd5 16. Nxf8 Kxf8 17. f3 Ne3 18. g3 Rd8 19. h4 g5 20. h5 g4 21.
Kf2 Bg5 22. f4 Nd1+ 23. Kg1 Bf6 24. Bg2 Nxb2 25. e4 Bc8 26. e5 Be7 27. Kh2 Nd1
28. Ra8 Nxc3 29. Rc1 Nb5 30. c6 bxc6 31. Rxc6 Bd7 32. Rb6 Rxa8 33. Bxa8 Kg7 34.
Rb7 Bc6 35. Rxe7 Bxa8 36. e6 Kf6 37. Rxf7+ Kxe6 38. Rxh7 Kf6 39. h6 Kg6 40. Rh8
Bf3 41. h7 Nd6 42. Rd8 Nf7 43. h8=Q Nxh8 44. Rxh8 Kf5 45. Re8 Bb7 46. Re5+ Kf6
47. b5 Ba8 48. b6 Bb7 49. Rc5 Ke6 50. Rc7 Ba6 51. b7 Bxb7 52. Rxb7 Kf5 53. Rb4
1-0

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Friday Night Quick Chess

Round 1

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Dean Brown”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1469”]
[ECO “B27”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1833”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. c3 Bg7 4. d4 cxd4 5. cxd4 d5 6. exd5 Qxd5 7. Nc3 Qd8 8.
Bc4 e6 9. O-O Ne7 10. Bg5 O-O 11. Re1 Nbc6 12. d5 f6 13. dxc6 fxg5 14. Qxd8
Rxd8 15. cxb7 Bxb7 16. Nxg5 Rd6 17. Nxe6 Bxc3 18. bxc3 Bd5 19. Bxd5 Rxd5 20.
Nc7 1-0

Round 2

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Joseph Griffin”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1833”]
[ECO “C68”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1139”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d3 f6 6. Nbd2 Be6 7. c4 Qxd3 8.
Qe2 O-O-O 9. Qxd3 Rxd3 10. O-O Bb4 11. b3 Ne7 12. a3 Bc3 13. Ra2 Rhd8 14. Rd1
Bg4 15. h3 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Rxf3 17. Rc2 Bxd2 18. Rdxd2 Rxd2 19. Rxd2 Rxb3 20. Kg2
Rc3 0-1

Round 3

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Campbell Dobbs”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1744”]
[ECO “B00”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1833”]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. d4 Nc6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O Bd6 7. c4 Qh5 8. h3
Bxh3 9. Ng5 Bg4 10. f3 Bh2+ 11. Kf2 Qh4+ 12. Ke3 Qxg5+ 13. f4 Bxe2 14. Qxe2 Qf6
15. Nc3 Nxd4 16. Ne4 Nxe2 17. Nxf6+ Nxf6 18. Kxe2 O-O-O 19. Rh1 Bg3 20. Rh3 Ne4
21. Kf3 f5 22. Be3 Rd3 23. Re1 Bxe1 0-1

Round 4

[Event “Quick Chess”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.04”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Vedant Margale”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1833”]
[ECO “C77”]
[EventDate “2019.01.04”]
[TimeControl “G/24, Inc 5”]
[WhiteElo “1378”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. O-O d6 8. Bg5 h6
9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 Bg4 11. Nc3 Nd4 12. Kh1 Qd7 13. Nd5 Nxd5 14. Bxd5 c6 15. Nxd4
Bxd4 16. Bxc6 Bxd1 17. Bxd7+ Kxd7 18. Raxd1 Bxb2 19. Rb1 Bd4 20. Rb3 Rhc8 21.
Rc1 Rc6 22. c3 Rac8 23. h4 Rxc3 24. Rbxc3 Rxc3 25. Rxc3 Bxc3 26. hxg5 hxg5 27.
Kg1 Kc6 28. Kf1 Kc5 29. Ke2 Kb4 30. f3 Ka3 31. Bf2 Kxa2 32. Bb6 a5 33. Bd8 a4
34. Bxg5 b4 35. Bc1 b3 36. g3 a3 37. Bxa3 Kxa3 38. Kd1 Ka2 39. Ke2 b2 40. f4
b1=Q 41. Kf3 Qd1+ 42. Kg2 Qg4 43. f5 Bd4 44. Kf1 Qf3+ 45. Ke1 Bc3# 0-1

New year, fresh start

Round 1 of the January 2019 Strong Swiss.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2019.01.02”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Sam Bridle”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1824”]
[ECO “B00”]
[EventDate “2019.01.02”]
[TimeControl “G/90, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1833”]

1. e4 Nc6 2. Nc3 d6 3. f4 Nf6 4. Nf3 e5 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. d3 Qe7 7. O-O g6 8. Nd5
Nxd5 9. exd5 Nb4 10. Bxd7+ Qxd7 11. fxe5 O-O-O 12. Ng5 dxe5 13. Nxf7 Bc5+ 14.
Kh1 Qxd5 15. Nxd8 Qxd8 16. a3 Nd5 17. Qg4+ Kb8 18. Bg5 Qd6 19. Rae1 h6 20. Bd2
g5 21. Qe4 Re8 22. b4 Bd4 23. Qxd4 1-0

Candy Cane Classic

This was a great tournament.  Even though I didn’t get a chance to play one of the two Master’s, there is always good comaraderie there.  The tournament also helped to put out of mind the sudden passing of my niece the day before, during the games and while I hung out with my chess buddies.

Round 1

I was five minutes late, and still felt a depressive lethargy during the game.  I noticed I was under 20 minutes, forgetting that it was G/70 to start with, and I felt I was in some time-warp for moving too slow, so decided not to blunder-check and play more nervously, bad idea.

16.Rd1? Loses the exchange.  While plugging this into my computer, I noticed the continuations 16.0-0, and 16.f4 Nc4, 17.Qd4 b5, 18.NxNf6 within five minutes of looking at the position.  For me, this was like a performance loss, I simply was not performing at my best, wasn’t in the right mental state.  After this round, I talked with my mom on the phone, and it pepped me up for the rest of the tournament.

[Event “Candy Cane Classic”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.12.29”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Dean Brown”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1405”]
[ECO “A32”]
[EventDate “2018.12.29”]
[TimeControl “G/70, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1851”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. Nf3 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Bc5 6. e3 O-O 7. g3 Nc6 8. Bg2
Qb6 9. Nb3 Bb4 10. Bd2 Ne5 11. Qe2 d5 12. cxd5 Rd8 13. e4 exd5 14. Nxd5 Bxd2+
15. Qxd2 Qd6 16. Rd1 Bg4 17. O-O Bxd1 18. Rxd1 Nc6 19. f4 Nxd5 20. exd5 Ne7 21.
Qd4 Qb6 22. d6 Rxd6 0-1

 

Round 2

The insidious, and insipid Scotch Gambit.  Luckily, I played a new line …f5, that he wasn’t prepared for.  It’s not very good, it’s just that he didn’t know that he should play c4 against it, rather than his usual plan.

[Event “Candy Cane Classic”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.12.29”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Blaine Newcomb”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1852”]
[ECO “C55”]
[EventDate “2018.12.29”]
[TimeControl “G/70, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1885”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. e5 d5 6. Bb5 Ne4 7. Nxd4 Bd7 8.
Bxc6 bxc6 9. O-O Bc5 10. Be3 O-O 11. f3 Ng5 12. f4 Ne4 13. Nd2 f5 14. Nxe4 fxe4
15. Qd2 Qe7 16. Nb3 Bb6 17. Qc3 Rae8 18. a4 g5 19. fxg5 Qxe5 20. Rxf8+ Kxf8 21.
Nc5 Bc8 22. a5 Qxc3 23. bxc3 Bxc5 24. Bxc5+ Kg8 25. Bxa7 Ba6 26. Rb1 Kf7 27.
Kf2 Kg6 28. Rb8 Rxb8 29. Bxb8 Kxg5 30. Bxc7 Kf5 1/2-1/2

 

Round 3

Will Wolf, the master of trappy lines and gambit openings, play “the Borg” against me.  He said that he accidentally played …b5 instead of …c5, and so dubbed it “the Monkey’s Bum”.  He touched my bishop and resigned, because it was guarded by my queen.  If he had simply moved his queen, I would have let him play on normally, but he insisted on resigning.  I mean, he wouldn’t have had to capture my bishop, since I figured it was a finger-fehler rather than an intentional touch (the two pieces were right next to each other).  Will will make a move, and then go out to joke around in the skittles room, so obviously just sits down and makes his move before paying attention first.

[Event “Candy Cane Classic”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.12.29”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Will Wolf”]
[Result “1-0”]
[BlackElo “1300”]
[ECO “B00”]
[EventDate “2018.12.29”]
[TimeControl “G/70, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1853”]

1. e4 g5 2. d4 Bg7 3. Bxg5 b5 4. Bxb5 c5 5. c3 Qb6 6. Qe2 cxd4 7. Nf3 1-0

 

Round 4

This was the game for the sole third-place prize.  The last few moves of the game are a recreation, since we repeated somewhere, and my handwriting got very sloppy as we both played on the increment for the last half of the game.

[Event “Candy Cane Classic”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.12.29”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Christopher Motley”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1853”]
[ECO “C44”]
[EventDate “2018.12.29”]
[TimeControl “G/70, Inc 30”]
[WhiteElo “1605”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 Nd5 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Bxd2+ 8.
Qxd2 d6 9. Bb5 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Ne1 f6 13. Nd3 fxe5 14. dxe5
Qh4 15. Nc3 Rae8 16. Nxd5 cxd5 17. f3 Be6 18. f4 d4 19. b3 Bf5 20. g3 Qd8 21.
Rae1 Bxd3 22. Qxd3 dxe5 23. fxe5 Rxf1+ 24. Kxf1 Qd5 25. Qc4 Qxc4+ 26. bxc4 Kf7
27. Re4 c5 28. Ke1 Ke6 29. g4 Rb8 30. Re2 Rb4 31. Rc2 Kxe5 32. Kd2 Kf4 33. Kd3
Ra4 34. Rb2 Ra3+ 35. Ke2 Rc3 36. Rb7 Rxc4 37. Rxa7 g5 38. Rxh7 Rc2+ 39. Kd3
Rxa2 40. Kc4 Rc2+ 41. Kd3 Rc3+ 42. Ke2 c4 43. Rf7+ Kxg4 44. Rd7 d3+ 45. Ke3 Rc2
46. Rd5 Re2+ 47. Kd4 d2 48. Kxc4 Rxh2 49. Rd3 Kh4 50. Kd4 g4 51. Ke4 Rf2 52.
Rd8 Kh3 53. Rh8+ Kg3 54. Rd8 Kg2 55. Ke3 g3 0-1

My rating after this tournament dropped to 1833, even though I was happy that I played in it, and got third place!  🙂

Solid Swiss

Round 4

My opponents in this tournament played quite solid.  I had a chance against Mark, but even there I didn’t see that the win was a win, and went on to lose that one.  My rating, after this tournament, will drop to somewhere between 1845 and 1850.

I had never played Bill before, didn’t know his repertoire, although I guessed that he would play the Sicilian, and was hoping not see the Najdorf, which is exactly what I got.  I offered Bill a draw, but then he offered me a draw after I played Re1.  I told him “Make a move” and he played the move I didn’t want to see, ….Kd6.  I had 3 min and 40 seconds when I began to consider the draw.  I figured that 34.Bf5 (the move I would have played) exf??, 35.Re6+! would be winning for White, but once I found 34…Ng8 for him, I agreed to the draw, figuring that was good enough, in my time pressure, although it’s about +.66.  34…Nb6! would draw for him, however, and he also has …Kc6 and …Kc7 to draw with.  Oh, I noticed, while plugging in the moves, that he could also play 34…Rb7, and that that draws.  He basically just has to avoid blundering here.  I was also under 2 minutes when I accepted the draw.

We had a quick post-mortem where he said he could probably take the pawn on f4, then I said that would be winning for White, and no sooner had I finished my sentence than he said “I can draw with this then” and whipped out …Re8, which is impressive, speed-wise.  ….Re8?? would actually lose to Rd1+, winning the knight, but he had 27 minutes left on his clock, and no doubt would have spent plenty of time on that move, as he was not rushing during the game.  Bill only needed a draw to win the tournament.  After the game, I figured that part of endgame skill is also leaving enough time on one’s clock to play one.  Overall, in this tournament, my opponent’s exercised a lot of self-control, and played quite solid.

 

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.12.26”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Bill Weihmiller”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1825”]
[GameNo “-1”]
[WhiteElo “1884”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Be7 8. Bd3
Nbd7 9. Qf3 Qc7 10. Nb3 h6 11. Bh4 Nxe4 12. Bxe7 Nxc3 13. Bxd6 Qxd6 14. bxc3
O-O 15. O-O Nf6 16. Rad1 Qb6+ 17. Kh1 Bd7 18. Nd4 Bc6 19. Nxc6 Qxc6 20. Qxc6
bxc6 21. c4 c5 22. Rb1 Rab8 23. h3 Nh5 24. Rxb8 Rxb8 25. Kh2 Kf8 26. g4 Nf6
27. Kg2 Ke7 28. Kf2 Rb2 29. Ra1 Nd7 30. Ke3 f6 31. Kd2 e5 32. Kc3 Rb8 33. Re1
Kd6 1/2-1/2

Round 3, Strong Swiss

Round 3

It’s amazed me how humbling it’s been, playing strong players the past two months.  Try to win a level position, and you lose, and otherwise you just draw anyway.

Blaine entered the tournament this round, and his rating is usually around Expert – for him, it’s the lowest rating in the past couple years.  His last tournament was the World Open, where he dropped below 1900.  He also played in the World Open last year, where he was rated 2048 going into it.  He really knows his stuff.  So, for example, on move 23 he still had 1hr 29 minutes left, or IOW had only used 1 minute of his clock time for his first 23 moves.

[Event “Strong Swiss”]
[Site “Club Chess!!”]
[Date “2018.12.19”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Blaine Newcomb”]
[Black “Brian Rountree”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[BlackElo “1884”]
[GameNo “-1”]
[WhiteElo “1887”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. e5 d5 6. Bb5 Ne4 7. Nxd4 Bd7 8.
Bxc6 bxc6 9. O-O Bc5 10. f3 Ng5 11. f4 Ne4 12. Be3 O-O 13. Nd2 Nxd2 14. Qxd2
f6 15. Nb3 Bb6 16. Qc3 Qe7 17. Rae1 fxe5 18. fxe5 Rxf1+ 19. Rxf1 Rf8 20. Rxf8+
Qxf8 21. Nc5 Bf5 22. b4 Qf7 23. Qd2 h6 24. a4 Qg6 25. a5 Bxc5 26. Bxc5 a6 27.
c3 Kf7 28. Qf4 Ke6 29. g3 Bh3 30. Qh4 Qb1+ 31. Kf2 Qc2+ 32. Ke1 Qc1+ 33. Ke2
Qc2+ 34. Ke1 Qxc3+ 35. Kd1 Qb3+ 36. Kc1 Qc3+ 37. Kd1 Qd3+ 38. Kc1 Qc3+ 39. Kd1
Qb3+ 40. Kd2 Qb2+ 41. Kd1 Qb3+ 42. Ke1 1/2-1/2

No adjournments

Round 4, final round

Pretty sure I could have figured out a draw, with an adjournment, but with three minutes OTB, it proved an impossible task for me.

43.exf6?  I was going to play the best move 43.Nc2, but figuring out the next ten to twenty moves from this proved overwhelming.  I was going to resign after this move, but played it out, not realizing that I could play Nh2, and give up the g3 pawn.  I had just assumed that the f and h pawns would go with it, but there is a crafty defense and it is still drawable.  Of course, Paul could make all those instant moves with his king, and I could see nothing, needed a long think.  Suspected I might be able to move the knight and sac that pawn, but I was rather depressed at this point, as a crowd gathered and I felt I had no answer.

[Event “December Swiss”]
[Site “CSCC”]
[Date “2018.12.18”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Brian Rountree”]
[Black “Paul Anderson”]
[Result “0-1”]
[BlackElo “1953”]
[GameNo “-1”]
[WhiteElo “1895”]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Na6 4. c3 Nc7 5. Bd3 g6 6. h3 h5 7. Nf3 Bf5 8. Bxf5
gxf5 9. Qb3 Qc8 10. O-O Bh6 11. Bxh6 Nxh6 12. Nbd2 Ne6 13. c4 Qd7 14. cxd5
cxd5 15. Rfc1 O-O 16. Qd3 Rfc8 17. Nh4 Ng7 18. f4 Rc6 19. Rxc6 Qxc6 20. Nb3
Rc8 21. Rc1 Qe8 22. Rc3 b6 23. g3 Rc6 24. Qb5 Rxc3 25. Qxe8+ Nxe8 26. bxc3 Nc7
27. a4 Kf8 28. Kf2 e6 29. Ke2 Ng8 30. Kd3 Ne7 31. Na1 Nc6 32. Nc2 Na5 33. Na3
a6 34. Nf3 Kg7 35. h4 Kg6 36. Nd2 b5 37. axb5 axb5 38. Kc2 Nc4 39. Naxc4 bxc4
40. Kb2 Nb5 41. Nb1 f6 42. Na3 Na7 43. exf6 Kxf6 44. Nc2 Nb5 45. Ne3 Nd6 46.
Kc2 Ne4 47. Nf1 Ke7 48. Kb2 Kd6 49. Kc2 Kc6 50. Kb2 Kb5 51. Kc2 Ka5 52. Kb2
Ka4 53. Kc2 Ka3 54. Kc1 Kb3 55. Kd1 Kxc3 56. Ke2 Kxd4 57. Kf3 c3 58. Ne3 Kd3
59. g4 fxg4+ 60. Nxg4 hxg4+ 61. Kxg4 c2 0-1